Finding Bass During a Mixed Spawn Season

 

Finding Bass During a Mixed Spawn Season

Yamaha Pro Mark Davis Offers Two Solutions For Catching Bass This Spring

Warmer-than-normal winter temperatures have shuffled bass spawning schedules on many lakes throughout the country this spring, but Mark Davis has seen it before, and the veteran Yamaha Pro knows just how to approach the problem.

“With the milder winter, bass began spawning much earlier than usual this year so when a fisherman heads to a lake this month, he’s probably going to find some bass in post-spawn, others on spawning beds, and even a few still in the pre-spawn stage,” notes Davis, a three-time B.A.S.S.® Angler of the Year and winner of the 1993 Bassmaster Classic.® “The fish are doing a lot of different things, but not a lot of them are doing the same thing.

“It’s a real curve ball, because some bass may be in water only a foot deep while others can be in water 20 feet deep, and the rest of them are somewhere in between.”

The first solution Davis offers for catching some of these fish is for an angler to simply begin fishing the way he wants to fish, using the lures and techniques in which he has the most confidence. 

He should decide which type of spawning fish he wants to catch, choose an area of the lake where that is likely to be happening, and then concentrate entirely on those fish. For example, if he prefers to go after post-spawn bass, Davis suggests looking for slightly deeper water in the 15 to 20-foot range and fishing a deep diving crankbait, a football head jig, or a Carolina rig and staying in that area of a lake.

“If you decide on this approach, you really need to forget about any shallow water bass,” emphasizes the Yamaha Pro, “because if you don’t commit totally to what you’re doing, you’ll never fish as effectively as you need to. Just remember, you’re probably not going to find a lot of bass because they’re so scattered.”

Davis describes his second, completely opposite solution as “junk fishing,” in which a fisherman does work both shallow and deep water. If he sees a potential shallow water target, he can cast to it, then turn and make his next cast toward standing timber in deeper water. He might follow with a third cast ahead of the boat to still another spot. Junk fishing usually involves a lot of running to different places, and it frequently means fishing entirely new water each day. This spring, it’s been a technique used by many of the tournament pros in both Bassmaster® and FLW® events.

“This is how I fished the recent Bassmaster® Elite tournament at Toledo Bend,” Davis admits. “I started the tournament in deep water looking for post-spawn bass, and I caught 24 keepers the first day, but all of them were small fish, and I only weighed in about 12 pounds. You can’t even place in a Toledo Bend event with weights like that, so I changed completely. The rest of the tournament I junk-fished water down to about 10 feet, working shallow for spawning and pre-spawn bass, and I eventually finished 36th overall.

“It wasn’t the way I wanted to fish, but on Toledo Bend, there is a huge bass population, so I actually moved up in the standings each day. On lakes that don’t have a large population of fish, a spring like the one we’re having now can really make fishing difficult.”

Another part of the problem, adds Davis, is the increased fishing pressure bass are receiving now, which also makes them more difficult to catch. Because fish are seeing more lures than ever before, and many are being caught and released multiple times, anglers need to remember to keep trying different lures and retrieves until some combination starts bringing strikes. 

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com Today!

Original Source; Yamaha Outboards.com 

Versatile 2500 Custom Carolina from Tidewater Boats

 

 
Versatile 2500 Custom Carolina from Tidewater Boats

By Craig Lamb

There is so much more to like about the new 2500 Custom Carolina Bay from Tidewater Boats than its head-turning good looks.

Tidewater Boats is known for designing boats for serious anglers, with serious features, using luxury appointments you find in a fine yacht. Wrap luxury around a performance hull and you have the newest model, 2500 Custom Carolina Bay.

As the name implies, this customized Tidewater is loaded from bow to stern with standard features.

This new Carolina Bay is a full-featured high-end, family-friendly bay boat with high-performance features. Fishermen will appreciate the open cockpit with abundant storage and plenty of room to move about the cabin to rig up and fight big fish.

2500 Custom Carolina Bay has a centerline of 25′ 2″ and a 9-foot beam. The boat has a fuel capacity of 74 gallons and rates for a maximum of 350 horsepower.

Here are standard features for the boat.

Electronic Power Steering

Pull up cleats

Raw water wash

Tilt steering

Wrap around seating with cushions

Aluminum Leaning post with backrest standard with 6YC

Information Station Digital Gauge

Compass

Windshield

Hydraulic Jack Plate

Trim Tabs

2 (30) gallon live wells

Built-In “Icehouse Cooler.”

Lockable rod storage for (8) 7.5’ rods

Under gunwale rod storage for over 8-foot rods

Console with room for a Porta Potty

Rear deck with jump seats

Rear deck with storage

Rear deck with pump/bilge access

Bow deck storage

Bow deck anchor locker

Floor bucket storage

Tidewater Boats are designed with distinctive Carolina Flair, setting up the dry ride, to direct waves away from the hull using reverse chines. Tidewater likes to appropriately call that feature the Dry Chine Ride.

Carolina Flair and the Dry Chine Ride are enhanced by another feature adding to the smooth, dry ride. The Corrugated Grid Stringer Vertebra absorbs the shock of waves against the hull in choppy water. Filled with foam to reduce noise and vibration, the stringer system works like a human skeleton to create a rigid, unified construction that tightly secures all of the internal parts. Those include fuel tanks, consoles, seating and storage compartments that are fastened to the stringer system. To ensure a solid, tight fit, every stringer system is customized for each Tidewater model.

Another defining Tidewater feature is the Spray Relief Point. That is the point of impact on the hull deflecting water away from the boat. Multiple SRP areas enhance the characteristic dry ride of the Tidewater.

Composite construction, foam filled hulls, cored decks, and gunwales plus much more quality design, materials and construction are extras that come with the price of a Tidewater.

By taking extra steps not found in most brands, Tidewater has the confidence in providing owners a 10-year, transferrable warranty that covers the hull.

Tidewater stays close to it’s saltwater roots with the manufacturing facility located in Lexington, S.C. Find out more about the complete lineup of models at tidewaterboats.com. Visit the growing community of Tidewater owners on Facebook at Tidewater Boats LLC.

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

Come to Tuna Town for the Best Offshore Fishing

 

Come to Tuna Town for the Best Offshore Fishing                       

By Craig Lamb

Take a short drive south of New Orleans, and you come to the southernmost point in Louisiana. It’s Venice and being at the end of the road is just the beginning of your trip for world-class yellowfin tuna fishing at Home Run Fishing Charters & Lodge.

The business’ phone number even includes the fish: (504) 909-TUNA.

“It’s why everybody wants to come to Venice,” said John Pisa.

He shares with his guide clients more than 20 years of experience of fishing the area.

“You might say that saltwater runs in my veins.”

Read more here about Pisa and his fellow captains at Home Run Charters.

What makes the trip to Venice worthwhile is the relatively short run it takes to get to the tuna water. The migratory tuna come within 10 miles of the Mouth of Passes or point where the Mississippi River meets the Gulf of Mexico.

The action gets hot when the yellowfin take flight. The aerobatic displays are unforgettable. So is hooking up with tuna up to 50 or 150 pounds cruising through. Some grow even bigger. This spring an angler landed a yellowfin tuna weighing 226 pounds. The fish caught from 300 feet of water ranks as the 10th heaviest yellowfin tuna ever brought to the scales in Louisiana.

Pisa says trolling for deep fish and setting lines behind a chum line are two popular methods his clients can expect to use on a day of fishing. So are topwater fishing and chunking baits at schooling tuna.

The day typically begins at 6 a.m. and runs 12 hours. The charter rate is $1,700 plus fuel for up to 6 anglers.

You’ll do that in style aboard some of the fastest and best-equipped boats in Venice. What that means is getting to the tuna water ahead of everyone else. Home Run Charters operates two 36’ Yellowfin 36 center console boats that are powered by 300-horsepower Yamaha outboards. The fish can’t hide, either. The boats are rigged with the latest GPS mapping and sonar devices available.

Click here to view more about the offshore fleet of boats.

Fast boats, world class fishing and knowledge you gain that makes you and even better angler the next time out. What could be better?

After a long day on the water, you find out upon returning to the dock. Home Run Lodges is no ordinary Venice end-of-the-road fish camp. Stylish Tommy Bahama furnishings set over rich hardwood floors. Separate living and dining rooms with a bar and kitchen.

Choose from non-inclusive or all-inclusive. With that, you get a decadent five-course meal, breakfast and a lunch to take on the boat.

Eat, sleep, fish. Repeat.

The perfect fishing vacation is waiting for you at Home Run Charters & Lodge.

Got questions? Click here for answers to frequently asked questions. Ready to book a trip. Go for it by clicking here. Got more questions? Call (504) 982-8862, or (504) 909-TUNA.

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

How to Build and Fish a Crappie Condo

 

How to Build and Fish a Crappie Condo

When warm weather hits, the crappie start biting. Depending on the region, after the spawn around April or May till the first cold front rolls through in the Fall, these tasty panfish are easy to find, usually congregating around brush piles that house the plankton and baitfish that make up the food chain. Although, anglers can spend a long time with their DownScan sonar looking for the ideal spot, many anglers are making their own brush piles, so they know exactly where to look.

In reality, anything will work as a brush pile – in many areas, anglers bundle together Christmas trees and weigh them down. The key to placement is depth. When the temperature climbs, crappie will move into deeper water. The ideal depth range is between 10 and 30 feet. Even government agencies like Fish and Wildlife, the Army Corps of Engineers and The National Park Service are involved in placing brush piles to offer the fish a comfortable and safe habitat — though they want to keep them in water deep enough so that they don’t become hazards to navigation. The problem with using trees and brush is that they eventually break down and have to be replaced after a few years. Additionally, hooks can snag on the limbs making it a challenge to fish.

Barry Stokes from FOX Sports Outdoors has found a great way to create manmade brush piles that won’t snag hooks and will last forever. Made with PVC pipe, recycled tubing, concrete and a bucket, Stokes’ crappie condos are just about guaranteed to catch fish when you know how to work them right. Typically, he places six to twelve in a clump five feet apart, and within a week the crappie will be in residence. The longer they sit in the water, the more algae grow, and the more life surrounds them.

When placing a brush pile, marking the location on a chart is vital to help find them once again. On 2D sonar, a brush pile will just appear to be a blob, but with the latest Lowrance DownScan sonar technology, the brush pile not only comes to life, but even the fish hiding in the tangle of PVC pipes become apparent.

According to Stokes, the best way to work the brush pile is to have an HDI transducer on your trolling motor. You want to be directly over of the brush pile with the transducer right under you. Using a vertical presentation, you lower down a jig. Stokes recommends 3/16 ounce as the heaviest weight with six- or eight-pound test line. You’ll have to experiment with depth, but once you get a bite, you can just keep dropping the jig to catch more fish. After a few catches, however, the crappie will get anxious and back off. If you are in a spot with a few brush piles grouped together, you can troll over to the next one and work them in sequence. By the time you get back to the first one, the spooked fish will have returned. If you have only a limited number of brush piles to work, you can also just back away with your trolling motor and cast from a distance. Using a lighter weight in the 1/8-to-1/24 ounce range when casting from a distance is preferred. This technique will draw out the fish that have been hiding.

To see how Barry built his crappie condos, watch the video here: http://foxsportsoutdoors.com/videos-main-page/search/condos/

Catch all the of the action from Barry Stokes and the team at FOX Sports Outdoors on FOX Sports Southwest, FOX Sports Southeast, Waypoint TV and on FOXSportsoutdoors.com.

Learn More: Visit Lowrance.com Today.

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Sea Chaser 26 LX Does it all for Summer Fun

 

Sea Chaser 26 LX Does it all for Summer Fun

By Craig Lamb

Snorkeling, cruising, beach combing, wildlife viewing, and fishing. The Sea Chaser 26 LX by Carolina Skiff is rigged and ready to do it all. When summer fun combines all of the above activities, this boat will easily make your short list of choices for an all-purpose center console boat.

Red drum, or redfish, is one of the most sought-after saltwater species for summertime angling. Narrow your choices to these five patterns and get the most from your summertime angling for this hard-fighting fish.

Redfish, Home Run Charters, Saltwater Fishing, Lodge, Base camp,

Jetties

Save these rocky structures until late summer. That’s when trophy reds begin congregating around jetties. Focus on the deepest water around the jetties and find those fish magnets using your electronics.

The redfish will school in deep holes and ambush baitfish swept across the neighboring shallow water. For artificial lures use lipless crankbaits and jerk baits fished with an erratic action to draw the attention of the redfish.

Marshes

In South Louisiana these grassy estuaries are ideal for sight fishing. Look for tailing redfish moving along the marsh lines. That is a sign of redfish feeding on small crabs and shrimp. Oyster and grass flats near a marsh line are top targets.

Marches nearest open water, river channels and cuts are best bets in the summertime. Key on areas where bottoms change and have irregular features, like oyster beds, sand flats or mud.

Rig up with jigs and live shrimp or crab for active fish. On calm days add a popping cork to live bait rigs or use a popper type topwater plug to create attention.

Beaches

Keep a big, splashy topwater rigged and ready whenever your boat is beached for an outing with friends and family. Big redfish will herd baitfish, such as mullet, and push them toward the beach. The presence of diving birds is always a good sign of redfish action.

The Sea Chaser 26 LX by Carolina Skiff and its shallow draft are ideal for accessing redfish territory. Length overall is 25’ 11 with a beam of 103.” Weight is 3,432 pounds with a transom size of 25 inches. The boat is rated for a maximum 350 horsepower. This boat is ideal for bays, rivers, lakes and even venturing offshore.

The 26 LX is loaded with a long list of standard features. Some of those are twin forward locking rod storage boxes, locking fiberglass hatches, gunwale rod storage with combing boards, storage locker with 5-gallon cast net bucket and lots of LED lighting.

Spacious raised decks offer plenty of space for fishing at bow and stern. Up front is a pair of tackle trays to keep essentials organized, and twin latches at port and starboards open to storage compartments. There’s a 25-gallon Livewell that keeps bait within easy reach.

At the helm is a leaning post with bench-style seat, complete with backrest, fold-down footrest, four-rod rocket launcher and a sizeable cooler and storage netting. Add an optional T-top for shade and to mount electronics and add more rods.

The Sea Chaser 26 LX by Carolina Skiff has been designed with a stepped hull to ensure unrivaled tracking, turning, fuel efficiency and acceleration. Constructed of 100% composite materials, you get peace of mind knowing this boat carries the legacy of the best-built boat available in the class.

Visit  Carolina Skiff.com  today and review all the different Sea Chasers models.

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Yamaha Pro Brandon Palaniuk Wins Toyota® Bassmaster® Texas Fest on Sam Rayburn

 

Yamaha Pro Brandon Palaniuk Wins Toyota® Bassmaster® Texas Fest on Sam Rayburn
THIRD ELITE VICTORY FOR THE 29-YEAR-OLD IDAHO PRO KNOWN AS “THE PRODIGY.”

Yamaha Pro Brandon Palaniuk finished Sunday’s Toyota®Bassmaster® Elite Texas Fest with a catch of 21 pounds, 12 ounces to capture the win on Sam Rayburn Reservoir with a four-day total of 93 pounds, 12 ounces.  It was the third Elite victory for the 29-year-old Idaho pro known as “the prodigy.”

Palaniuk started Wednesday’s opening round with his biggest fish of the tournament — a largemouth that weighed 8-4.  He caught the bass in deeper water than what was being fished by most of the field. That gave him the confidence to stay away from the shallower areas that were holding large numbers of bass, but not necessarily the size it would take to win

I was torn between deep and shallow,” he said. “There were so many fish shallow, and you could get so many bites, but I just wasn’t getting the big fish that I needed. I just kept telling myself the big fish were out deep, and if I could stick it out and get five to 10 bites a day, I could have a chance to win.”

Palaniuk spent a lot of time idling around looking for the usual summer post spawn hot spots, like the tips of points, humps, and ledges. While moving from spot to spot on straight banks, he found several brush piles with incredible numbers of crappie and one or two bigger dots that he believed were bass –  and he was right.

“I knew that if I was hooking 8- or 9-pounders in brush piles on a lighter line, there was a chance I was going to lose some,” he said. “Those fish are so strong, and that stuff is so thick. And it wasn’t like I was fishing the outsides of it. I was throwing directly into it and trying to get it to drop directly down into the center where the fish were.”

On the final day, he had all of the kinks worked out and was ready to catch the winning bag.

“On Sunday, I had the least amount of big bites I’ve had all week,” he said. “But I executed 100 percent — and that was the difference maker.”

Palaniuk’s win earned him the $100,000 first-place prize and automatic entry into the 2018 GEICO® Bassmaster Classic® presented by DICK’S Sporting Goods® on South Carolina’s Lake Hartwell.

Yamaha Marine products are marketed throughout the United States and around the world. Yamaha Marine Group, based in Kennesaw, Ga., supports its 2,000 U.S. dealers and boat builders with marketing, training, and parts for Yamaha’s full line of products and strives to be the industry leader in reliability, technology, and customer service. Yamaha Marine is the only outboard brand to have earned NMMA®’s C.S.I. Customer Satisfaction Index award every year since its inception. Visit www.yamahaoutboards.com.

This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only and are not intended to be an endorsement.

Original Source:  Yamaha Outboards.com 

Five Proven Rigs for Dolphin

 

Five Proven Rigs for Dolphin

By Craig Lamb

Dolphin, sometimes called the mahi-mahi, are one of the tastiest, sporting game fish in the sea. This species is especially fun to catch during summer, when schools of dolphin congregate around drifting objects like grass, floating debris or offshore drilling platforms.

Hook up with one dolphin and others will follow your catch back to the boat. One or more larger fish might even blitz the bait with your fish on the line. The iridescent blue, green and yellow hues of the species make it even more prized by saltwater anglers. So do the acrobatic leaps of the fish when hooked.

Photo: Home Run Charters

Here are five proven rigs for summer success with dolphin.

Ready rig

This is just a catch phrase to explain the importance of always having a spinning rod and reel always at the ready. Dolphin can appear from nowhere around drifting grass, floating debris or other isolated habitats.

Spool up with 20-pound test line on a medium/heavy reel and rod combo. Use a weedless ballyhoo rig. Make it by running the hook point through the gill and out the throat of the ballyhoo. Insert the hook into the belly to make it weedless. You can also add a small skirt over the nose of the ballyhoo for additional strike appeal and to deflect weeds.

Keep the ballyhoo rig in a bucket of saltwater and be ready when the fish show up.

Real thing

You can also set a drift along a weed line using live bait. The rig is simple but effective. Just tie a 2/0 or 3/0 live bait hook to 20-pound line on a spinning reel. Pitch the lure to the edge of the weed line. The weightless and simple rig lets the bait swim enticingly into the weeds.

Go deep

If a school of dolphin suddenly disappears have ready a 3/4-ounce jigging spoon rigged to a casting outfit. The rig can be dropped vertically along the edge of the weed line and worked at various depths. Use a snapping action with your wrist to impart the action of a wounded bait fish.

Chunk of bait

When all else fails, you can rig a chunk of ballyhoo to a 6/0 live bait hook. Use a stout, heavy action rod and reel spooled with 50-pound test. Use a long leader, at least 20 feet, so you can snip off sections as the line becomes frayed without having to retie the entire rig. Add a few ounces of weight and complete the rig with a balloon. Allow it to drift along the edge of the weed line.

Chugging along

To fire up a school of dolphin, you can’t go wrong with a noisy topwater bait. Chugger-style plugs make a great choice for the splashing action imparted when the lure is worked across the surface.  

A center console boat designed for hardcore offshore fishing without sacrificing luxury features is the unbeatable combination found in the Tidewater 252 CC Adventure.

Here’s a preview of how luxury meets performance in a center console rig. Flip out the comfy back rests on the cushioned forward bench seating and you get a bow rider experience. A new center console mounting system and standard hardtop set this rig up for serious fishing.

What else sets the Tidewater 252 CC Adventure apart from the rest are the specs of the boat. It has a length overall of 24’ 8” and a wide beam spanning 9’ 3” for a solid ride and plenty of interior room. The boat weighs 4,150 pounds with a fuel capacity of 126 gallons for making long runs offshore. Twin 115 h.p. outboards are recommended for optimum fuel economy and performance, with a maximum of 300 h.p. A 21-degree deadrise at the transom creates a soft ride in waves and chop. Cockpit depth rises from 27.5” to 33.5” inches at midship and bows for a safe, drier ride. 

Top off the above features with foam floatation, all-composite, no wood construction and a hand-laid fiberglass boat and you get the most reliable, dependable boat in it’s class.

Split fishing boxes, storage for terminal tackle utility boxes, abundant rod storage, and fresh water wash down adds to the fishing features. A 25-gallon aerated live well is designed with round corners to reduce fish stress and finished in blue to keep bait calm.

Hardcore anglers and discriminating boaters like to customize their rigs with options that suit their needs. The Tidewater 252 CC Adventure delivers with the best quality accessories available. Leaning post options are many. Choose from a deluxe drop bolster version, or a leaning post with a sink or a live well. A LED lighting package, Taco 280 Grandslam outriggers, and underwater lights are among the many other options.

A luxury experience with a performance edge. That’s what you get with the Tidewater 252 CC Adventure.

Tidewater stays close to it’s saltwater roots with the manufacturing facility located in Lexington, S.C. Find out more about the complete lineup of models,  at tidewaterboats.com. Visit the growing community of Tidewater owners on Facebook at Tidewater Boats LLC.

Originl Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Get the Right Gaff!

 

Get the Right Gaff!

By Capt. Gus Cane

Nets work well for handling smaller inshore species, but for big, powerful adversaries gaffs are the preferred tool for landing fish. There are several sizes, lengths and even styles of gaffs though, so getting the right one is important.

Gaffs handles are usually made of aluminum or fiberglass. The hook end of the shaft is often tapered for less resistance in the water. The butt end is thicker for extra strength and has a plastic or EVA foam grip for better retention with wet hands. The hook itself is stainless steel of various gauges depending on the size and type. A rounded bend hook is the most popular, although diamond-shaped hooks are becoming more common. When considering shaft lengths, take into account the height of the boat’s gunwales above the waterline. Shorter lengths offer better control, while longer ones reduce the reach. Storage aboard the boat when the gaff is not in use is another consideration before purchasing.

For smaller sized fish like schoolie kingfish or dolphin, a 2-inch hook on a 4- to 6-foot shaft gaff is a good choice. The hook’s gape or the distance between the hook point and shaft or handle should match the approximate depth of the fish’s body being landed. The smaller the gauge of hook, the easier it will penetrate. A 3-inch gaff will handle fish up to 50 pounds or so, while a 4-inch gaff is designed for big broad fish like tuna and sharks up to 250 pounds. Keep in mind more than one gaff may be needed to swing fish of that size aboard.

Specialty Gaffs are designed for specific purposes. Tournament king mackerel anglers prefer 12-foot long 3-inch gaffs to make sure “smokers” don’t get away. Flying gaffs are heavy-duty versions with large gape hooks that detach from the handle. A rope is tied to a reinforced cleat on the boat, and once the fish is gaffed, the hook pulls free, yet the rope keeps the trophy tethered. Flying gaffs are mostly used for marlin, tuna and large pelagic sharks like makos or threshers.

Gaffing requires timing, steady nerves and lots of practice. Veteran gaff men make sure the hook point is facing down and towards the boat as the fish is brought alongside to avoid breaking the line. It’s best to aim the hook point towards the head for better control and not ruin the meat. After the fish is gaffed, the angler should back off the reel drag or switch to the clicker mechanism to prevent line overruns if the fish takes off again. Communication between the angler and the gaff man is critical too. The angler shouldn’t pull the fish’s head out of the water, while the gaffer must wait patiently for a clean shot. With the proper timing and deft moves, even the largest prey can be gaffed, subdued and brought safely aboard.

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com today.

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Catch Spring and Summer Stripers with these Tactics

 

Catch Spring and Summer Stripers with these Tactics

By Craig Lamb

Fishing between seasons is a time of transition, and especially between spring and summer. Game fish species migrate from shallow spawning grounds out into the comfort zone of cooler, deeper water.

Dialing into where those fish might be, can be tricky and especially so for the nomadic striped bass. Stripers like a cooler thermocline where they follow and feed upon schools of baitfish.

Many southern reservoirs offer great opportunities to catch stripers. Best of all, stripers are a landlocked version of their saltwater kin. Without taking a long road trip to the coast, you can land a big catch.

Shane Watson has spent decades on Lake Lanier, the Georgia impoundment located outside Atlanta that is known for it’s incredible striped bass fishery. As spring turns to summer, you can count on these tips from this expert.

For any Southern manmade impoundment with stripers, he suggests beginning the day shallow and working deeper.

“In the early morning the stripers congregate around main lake points, humps and high spots,” says Watson. “Why they do that is to herd baitfish up in the shallow water to feed.”

Watson guides his clients to success by free-lining live blueback herring on a split shot rig. Cast the rig into the shallow water and allow the bait to drift across the strike zone. As a general rule, he suggests keeping baits in the 5- to 10-foot depth range on the points and humps. Reef poles are specific targets when fishing Lake Lanier.

Another option, and a heart pounding choice at that, is to cast topwater lures in the same areas. Top choices for Watson and his guides are the Heddon Zara Spook or Cotton Cordell Redfin. Use a slow, waking to retrieve to mimic the live action of the baitfish.

“Always have a topwater ready for schooling stripers early in the morning,” he suggests. “You never know when or where they will come up to feed.”

Move deeper after the sun gets higher and the topwater and shallow feeding bites subside.

“After the sun gets up the stripers move out into deeper water,” continues Watson.

To reach the fish use a simple down line rig. Make it by tying a live bait hook to the end of a 3- to 6-foot leader. To the opposite end of the leader line tie a barrel swivel. Insert a 1- to 3-ounce egg sinker through the main line and then complete the rig by tying it to the leader. Use live blueback herring or whatever commercially available live bait is best suited for your area.

Watson suggests setting up a trolling path between 20 and 30 feet over points and humps in 30 to 60 feet of water. Use your depth finder to find schools of baitfish and stripers for best success.

As the weather continues to moderate and water temperatures warm the stripers move into creek channel mouths intersecting the main river channel.

The reason is most manmade reservoirs in the South are used for hydroelectric power generation. The resulting current stimulates baitfish and game fish activity. So checking power generation schedules is a wise idea when fishing for summertime stripers.

Watson operates Shane Watson Guide Service (phone: 770-235-9829, lakelanierstripers.com). His fleet of Carolina Skiff and Sea Chaser boats operates with six full-time guides averaging 300 days of fishing on Lake Lanier and elsewhere around Atlanta. Watson is also an inductee of the National Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame.

For decades, Watson has fished from Sea Chaser and Carolina Skiff, having owned up to 20 of the boats over the years.

“Carolina Skiff builds a quality boat with all the features an angler needs,” he says. “They are great people, have a fine dealer network and will help you find an affordable boat with the most value.”

Watson’s personal boat is the Sea Chaser 26 LX. At 25’ and 11” in length the boat has an extremely wide beam of 103”. That offers plenty of deck space for guide clients to move around the deck while trolling lines are out, or for casting to surface-feeding fish. His fleet also includes a full line of Carolina Skiff models, including the roomy 238 DLV, at 22’ 8” and the 218 DLV, at 22’ 10”.

See the full line of Carolina Skiff and Sea Chaser boats at carolinaskiff.com. With 60 different options and models, you can use the Build A Boat feature. On the website, you can find a dealer, request a catalog and more. Check out the loyal following of Carolina Skiff fans and owners on Facebook.

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Yamaha Marine Endorses Ocean Debris Cleanup Bill

 

Yamaha Marine Endorses Ocean Debris Cleanup Bill
SAVE OUR SEAS ACT IS GOOD FOR BOATERS, ANGLERS, AND COASTAL COMMUNITIES

Yamaha Marine Group today announced its endorsement of S. 756, the bipartisan Save Our Seas Act, which was introduced in the U.S. Senate by Senators Dan Sullivan (R-AK), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), and Cory Booker (D-NJ.)  The bill aims to strengthen research and international coordination of anti-debris efforts to protect America’s oceans, coastlines, and inland waterways.  In addition to reauthorizing the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA®) Marine Debris Program, the bill allows for additional funding to assist with debris cleanup, and encourages the executive branch to engage with the nations responsible for the majority of marine debris.

sea polluted with plastic garbage

“When Senator Sullivan told us about the Save Our Seas Act in mid-March, we were eager to support it,” said Martin Peters, Senior Manager, Government Relations, Yamaha Marine Group. “Keeping America’s oceans and waterways clean is very important to boaters and anglers, and we encourage the entire industry to send letters in support of this bill to their Congressmen through Yamaha Marine Advocacy or BassforSalt.com.”

Boaters and anglers are encouraged to send prewritten letters of support to their legislators through Bass Anglers for Saltwater Conservation, which can be found at BassforSalt.com.

The Save Our Seas Act was unanimously passed out of the Senate Commerce Committee on April 5, 2017, and now awaits action on the Senate floor. It has also been endorsed by Senators Chris Coons (D-DE), Jim Inhofe (R-OK), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Gary Peters (D-MI), and Thom Tillis (R-NC.)

“The Charm of Fishing is that it is the pursuit of what is elusive but attainable, a perpetual series of occasions for hope” John Buchan

Yamaha Marine products are marketed throughout the United States and around the world. Yamaha Marine Group, based in Kennesaw, Ga., supports its 2,000 U.S. dealers and boat builders with marketing, training and parts for Yamaha’s full line of products and strives to be the industry leader in reliability, technology and customer service. Yamaha Marine is the only outboard brand to have earned NMMA®’s C.S.I. Customer Satisfaction Index award every year since its inception. Visit www.yamahaoutboards.com.

This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only and are not intended to be an endorsement. * Helm Master available on select new twin, triple and quad Yamaha outboards installed on new boat packages manufactured by participating boat builders and sold by authorized dealers only.

Original Source:  Yamaha Outboards.com