Seatrout Secrets

 

Seatrout Secrets

By Capt. Gus Cane

Spotted seatrout or specks as they’re often called, are a favorite quarry for skiff anglers from the Chesapeake Bay to Laguna Madre. They can be fooled by a variety of baits and lures, they’re abundant and delicious prepared several ways. Smaller trout are not difficult to find. Trophy “gator” trout are very wary, however, and a challenging adversary. To catch big fish, try these techniques:

Start on top but stay flexible. Trout are ambush predators and big trout like big baits. Topwater stick lures are effective, especially with a “walk-the-dog” or a darting, sideways retrieve. If the lure has rattles or a cupped face to make noise or spit water, that’s added attraction. Make long casts and work the lure back with an erratic, wounded motion. The fish will often track the lure for a distance before striking.

If the trout strikes and misses, pause the lure for a moment before resuming the retrieve. Trout usually kill a bait first before swallowing it. If the short strikes continue without a hookup, switch rods and try a subsurface presentation such as a soft-plastic jerk bait, imitation shrimp or suspending plug. Live shrimp rigged on a leader under a clacker-style cork will fool big trout too. The noise of the cork’s rattles/beads mimic frantic shrimp and arouse attention. If a trout hits the cork instead, switch over to a topwater plug.

Trophy trout are also similar to realtors. It’s all about location, location, location. Ambush points like sandy pot holes in sea grass flats, oyster bars, creek mouths, and pilings are convenient places to hide before pouncing on a passing meal. Even color changes between muddy or dirty water and clear can hold big trout. Find those spots, and you’ll find the fish.

Big “gator” trout are mainly loners. They don’t get big by being stupid so hunt for them in less pressured areas. That typically means super-skinny flats or tidal creeks that don’t see a lot of boat traffic.

Big trout like freebies too. While drifting the flats actively casting, rig a live pinfish, finger mullet or pilchard on a circle hook and float and let it drag behind the boat. You’ll cover more water, and that struggling morsel often attracts some of the biggest trout in the area.

If you love to catch trout, redfish and other inshore species, the Carolina Skiff 18 JVX CC is perfect for you!

Designed with fishing in mind, the 18 JVX CC will provide you great access to shallow creeks and rivers where you need to fish.

The JVX 18 CC is a solid performer with a lightweight hull, Mod V Hull design and can carry more weight further and faster to yield more valuable fishing time on the water. With a length of 17 feet 9 inches and a beam of 78 inches, you will be able to reach all of your hot spots effectively and efficiently.

There are many standard options available including full instrumentational console, front deck 12-volt trolling motor plug, 12 gallon live well and a 70-quart removable cooler. Plus, there are many additional options available to meet your needs from a raw water wash-down to upgrades to a 24-volt trolling motor.

Check out the Carolina Skiff JVX 18 CC or better yet, you can Build Your Own Boat by adding all of the options that are important to you.

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

Charleston Water Taxi Depends on Yamaha to Stay on Time

 

Charleston Water Taxi Depends on Yamaha to Stay on Time

By Craig Lamb

The Ms. Evelyn and Dorothy Marie are 40-foot Corinthian Catamarans that run a continuous loop around Charleston Harbor. From 9 a.m. until 8 p.m. daily, the Charleston Water Taxi boats ferry passengers to and from historical sites and the entertainment and dining district that are unique to the South Carolina coastal town.

The water taxis run every hour with a 30-minute turnaround time over the 4-mile, round-trip excursion. A tight, nonstop schedule running 11 hours each day of the year makes being on time the most important part of the business.

That is why Capt. Scott Connelly and Capt. Chip Deaton, co-owners of the Charleston Water Taxi, depend on Yamaha to power their catamarans.

“People depend on us to be on schedule, every day, seven days a week,” said Connelly, like his partner, natives of Charleston who’ve made lifelong careers of working on the water.

“Keeping that hourly schedule is key to us,” added Deaton. “We are a taxi service and the reliability of Yamaha proved itself to us in the first year.”

That was back in 2005 when they launched the business.

“We went with Yamaha first, knowing it would be the most dependable brand for us, especially with the risks involved in launching a new business,” explained Connelly.

“We went with 150 horsepower outboards and got 800 hours from the first set without any problems,” continued Deaton. “We kept on going with another set of 150s and got 8,700 hours from those outboards.”

“We can’t afford downtime, and at the end of the day we want to go home, be with our families.”

They get to do that thanks to the dependability of Yamaha technology. In fact, the current set of 2.8L F200 In-Line Four outboards has produced remarkable performance.

“We have 7,000 and counting on this set,” continued Deaton.

To put that into perspective, running an outboard motor for 7,000 hours is equivalent to driving a vehicle for 225,000 miles in urban commuting.

“Other than routine maintenance we haven’t had any issues with our Yamahas,” said Connelly.

Click here to see an interactive graphic for benefits of the F200.

Repowering the Ms. Evelyn and Dorothy Marie was made easy with mounting centers and bolt patterns that are identical to Yamaha’s two-stroke HPDI 200. Upgrading to digital rigging was easy, too.

Connelly and Deaton like the faster acceleration, efficient power and best power-to-weight ratio of the F200. Passengers like the benefit of carrying on conversations about their Charleston experience and touring plans. They do that thanks in part to the new Shift Dampener System (SDS) hardware. An SDS propeller, together with counterbalancing shafts, helps minimize shifting vibration for a quieter, smoother ride.

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com 

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

Yamaha Marine Receives Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellors Award for Excellence in Philanthropy

 

Yamaha Marine Receives Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellors Award for Excellence in Philanthropy
DONATIONS OVER LAST FIVE YEARS “REFLECT TRUE SPIRIT” OF AWARD

Yamaha Marine Group announced today that it was named the recipient of the Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellors Award for Excellence in Philanthropy. The award recognizes Yamaha’s contributions to the Motorcycle and Marine Service Program at the Tennessee College of Applied Technology (TCAT) Chattanooga.

“Recipients of the Chancellors Award for Excellence in Philanthropy are selected based on their generous donation of resources to a Tennessee Board of Regents institution,” said Flora W. Tydings, Chancellor, Tennessee Board of Regents. “Yamaha Marine’s body of work over the last 14 years with the Tennessee College of Applied Technology Chattanooga, and especially in the last five years with donations totaling more than $150,000, reflects the true spirit of the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Philanthropy.”

“As our technical education program grows and expands, we are pleased to extend our resources to the Motorcycle and Marine Service Technology Program at TCAT Chattanooga,” said Joe Maniscalco, Division Manager, Yamaha Marine Service. “We are honored to receive the Chancellors Award for Philanthropy as we work toward our goal of preparing students for a fulfilling, high-demand career in marine service.”

Yamaha Marine products are marketed throughout the United States and around the world. Yamaha Marine Group, based in Kennesaw, Ga., supports its 2,000 U.S. dealers and boat builders with marketing, training and parts for Yamaha’s full line of products and strives to be the industry leader in reliability, technology and customer service. Yamaha Marine is the only outboard brand to have earned NMMA®’s CSI Customer Satisfaction Index award every year since its inception. Visit www.yamahaoutboards.com.

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This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only, and are not intended to be an endorsement.

Original Source: Yamaha Outboards.com 

Lowrance provided Serious Excitement on and off the Water at the Bassmaster Classic

 

Lowrance provided Serious Excitement on and off the Water at the Bassmaster Classic

Lowrance® continued its domination of America’s tournament-fishing circuit late last month as Lowrance Pro Jordan Lee won the 2017 Bassmaster Classic Championship on Lake Conroe in Houston, Texas. A 25-year-old professional angler from Guntersville, Alabama, Lee became the sixth consecutive Lowrance angler to win the Classic when he finished with a three-day total of 56 pounds, 10 ounces, taking home $300,000 and the most coveted trophy in the sport. Steve Kennedy, who also competed in the event with Lowrance marine electronics, finished second with a total weight of 55 pounds, 1 ounce.

On the final day of the Classic, 15 of the top 25 competitors — including seven of the top 12 anglers – were using Lowrance HDS fishfinder/chart-plotters to navigate and find key fish-holding areas. For Lee, 2017 was his second appearance at the Bassmaster Classic. He finished 6th in the 2014 Classic at Lake Guntersville in Alabama.

During practice at Lake Conroe, Lee used his HDS-12 Gen3 with StructureScan® 3D imaging to identify an underwater “point” with a hard-bottom area that he thought would hold fish. He returned to the spot on the final day, where he was limited by mechanical issues on his boat, which held him in the same spot all day. Staying in that spot proved to be the difference as Lee jumped from 15th to first place with a 27-pound, 4-ounce, five-fish limit, the biggest single-day catch of the tournament.

At the tournament, there was plenty of excitement off the water as well. Lowrance announced the production of the HDS CarbonTM 16, a new high-performance fishfinder/chart plotter with a 16-inch screen – the largest ever produced by Lowrance.  

The massive 16-inch high-definition screen on HDS Carbon 16 displays provides an even bigger stage to showcase the clarity, high resolution and superior target separation of SolarMAX™ HD technology, exclusive to the HDS Carbon series. Setting up a four-panel split on the HDS Carbon 16 gives anglers the equivalent of four seven-inch screens on a single display.

Anglers in the market for a do-it-all, integrated system need a processor that can smoothly drive high-tech features like StructureScan® 3D with SideScan and DownScan Imaging™, StructureMap™, Broadband Radar™ and SiriusXM® Weather Chart Overlay. HDS Carbon 16 delivers on that front, taking processing power to the next level with a dual-core processor that allows anglers to switch between applications and simultaneously view independent sonar feeds with ease.

Lowrance SolarMAX HD display technology features high-definition views and clear visibility in all conditions with the widest available range of viewing angles – even when wearing polarized sunglasses. The new displays feature 1920×1080 HD resolution and are engineered to withstand higher temperatures than conventional units, offering enhanced reliability in warmer climates. The secret behind the new SolarMAX HD displays come from the implementation of the most advanced IPS (in-plane switching) screens in fishing electronics. With superior color accuracy and boosted high-definition reproduction, IPS screens are perfectly designed for viewing picture-like sonar images. Whether viewing menu panels or onscreen fish targets, the improved clarity and sharpness of SolarMAX HD displays are clearly evident from any viewing angle.

With Live Network Sonar, HDS Carbon 16 gives anglers the capability to view and control two independent, live sonar sources at different locations — like the front and the back of the boat — from a single display. This powerful feature provides anglers with a comprehensive picture of underwater activity with convenient and complete control. 

In addition to integrated wireless connectivity, HDS Carbon 16 features Bluetooth® control of multiple Power-Pole® shallow water anchors and Bluetooth audio streaming from the SonicHub®2 marine entertainment system. Anglers can navigate with ease behind proven Lowrance navigation technology, high-resolution mapping with enhanced coverage of coastal and inland waters, a 10 Hz internal GPS antenna, and a multitude of mapping options accessible from the unit’s dual microSD card slots. HDS Carbon 16 is compatible with the most expansive selection of optional cartography on the market, including Insight Genesis™ custom mapping, C-MAP Insight PRO, C-MAP Lake Insight HD, C-MAP MAX-N+, Navionics® and more.

HDS Carbon 16 supports radar, SmartSteer™ control of Motorguide® Xi5 trolling motors and the Lowrance Outboard Pilot and full engine data integration highlighted by compatibility with Mercury® VesselView® Link.

Congratulations to Jordan Lee and all the anglers competing in the tournament. And look for more exciting developments from Lowrance in the near future.

Catch more fish, learn more at Lowrance.com  Today!

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

Turn an Average Day on the Flats into an Epic One!

 

Turn an Average Day on the Flats into an Epic One!

The sight of a cruising redfish nosing down on a well-presented artificial bait is enough to get any angler’s heart pumping at a rapid pace, but stalking redfish in skinny waterfalls outside the comfort zone of many fishermen.  Whether fishing the Laguna Madre, Biloxi Marsh, Everglades, or Carolina coast – or anywhere in between – following a few common guidelines will help turn an average day on the flats into an epic one.

First and foremost, silence is the key when hunting redfish, as these finicky predators spook very easily from the slightest sound or vibration.  In windy conditions or in turbid waters, a trolling motor may allow you to get close enough to spot and cast to pods of reds, but savvy anglers rely on push poling to quietly ease across the shallows in search of signs of life.  A stealthy approach is critical, particular when fish are pressured or in unusually calm weather, so keep splashing and moving around the boat to a minimum.

In terms of spotting fish, just a few inches of added elevation off the water can make a world of difference.  Most flats boats offer raised poling and casting platforms, but anglers without such specialized craft can enhance their fish-spotting capabilities using a sturdy, roto-molded cooler or small stepladder to gain a better vantage point.  Even in cloudy conditions, a pair of quality, polarized sunglasses are a must, and most inshore guides prefer those with amber lenses that match the tint of backcountry waters.

When scanning for signs of redfish, anglers must keep a sharp lookout for a variety of clues that could lead to paydirt.  Redfish tails are the most obvious giveaways, of course, and indicate fish tipped nose down rooting for crustaceans or cruising slowly through very shallow water.  In clear water, the dark outlines of fish can be spotted, sometimes easily against the contrast of a light-colored sand or mud bottom.  While V-shaped head wakes, or sometimes a series of wakes in the case of schooling fish, are surefire signs of active fish, sometimes a small patch of slightly riffled, ‘nervous’ water can be a dead giveaway to the presence of laid up or milling fish.  Skittering shrimp or baitfish also signify the presence of larger predators like redfish.

When casting to redfish, there is little room for error, as a cast too close to the fish will spook it and send it scurrying, but a cast too far away from the fish will seldom get noticed.  The objective is to lead the fish, casting beyond the fish’s path and bringing the bait into its field of vision, all while being careful not to swim the bait towards the fish in an unnatural manner.

While redfish are opportunistic feeders that eat a variety of crabs, shrimps, worms and baitfish, choosing the right bait is not so simple.  Redfish will take a variety of soft swimbaits, hard baits, spoons, and spinners at times, but rarely will they pass up a slow-moving shrimp meandering in their path, so a soft plastic shrimp imitation gets the nod as the most versatile lure for sight casting to redfish.

At the top of the list of shrimp, baits are the new EZ ShrimpZ from Z-Man Fishing Products.  When rigged with the company’s EZ KeeperZ weighted hook, the pairing is aerodynamic and easy to cast accurately and lands softly in the water, so as not to spook the fish.  In fact, its re-entry sounds similar to a shrimp skipping across the surface.  When twitched slowly, the segmented tail comes to life, and when paused on the bottom, the buoyant ElaZtech body of the bait floats up and hovers just off the bottom, just like a real shrimp.  Unlike most other artificial baits, this combination can be presented very slowly while still maintaining a natural look, allowing the bait more time in the fish’s field of vision than other baits that must be fished more quickly.

While sight-fishing redfish can be a tricky undertaking, employing stealthy approaches, precision casting, and ultra-realistic bait presentations will certainly tip the odds in your favor.

Visit Z Man Fishing.com Today!

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

What to Tip the “Tipper”

 

What to Tip the “Tipper”

He or she is your guide into those woods, out on that river, etc. They are the ones who have gone to school and been educated in this particular sport/pleasure you are delving into for your vacation time, and they are the ones with companies that make it easier than ever to plan a guided hunt or trip for you, family and friends. They are also the ones with just the right “tip” that could allow you to have the most successful hunt you’ve ever had.successful hunting, proper, appreciation, long-standing relationship, service, quality, the right 'tip'

Over the internet, a lover of the hunt (or fishing, boating, etc.) can log on and go through a list of outfitter websites that contain everything about their company and their team. They will offer up information that all prospective sportsmen and sportswomen need to know: from accommodations provided to equipment to pictures of the areas being utilized for the sport, animals harvested in the past, as well as various packages and prices.

But, oddly enough (unlike the rest of American business and industry in the 21st-century), you will most likely never find anything about what specific dollar amount or percentage of the hunt cost to give the guide as a tip. And because each package is so completely different, coming up with an average tip can be extremely tough. This is a gray area for many sports people, especially those who have never been on a guided hunt/tour before.

It is understood that a tip is not a requirement. However, it is important to realize that if you “land” a quality service and a guide who truly loves what they do and knows the ins-and-outs of everything they happen to be doing, than offering your guide a tip is the best way to offer thanks to them for their service.

It is important to remember as well that if the guide is not the outfitter, they are usually told what to do by someone higher up in charge. They may not have any say when it comes to choosing the location or what your accommodations will be during your stay. That is the outfitter’s responsibility, and your guide should never be “hung out to dry” if that outfitter has made errors in your trip. The guide’s tip is always based on the job that they did for you and your friends/family. If for the duration of your event they work as your partner – such as, on a hunt, if they help fill your tags, make sure you have a safe hunt, and offer those stellar, helpful ‘tips,’ than they should be rewarded with a “thank you.”

If the outfitter is both the owner and your guide, then it becomes a different story entirely. They are the ones responsible for every detail during your trip – from being the guide to making sure your hunt is set up well and your accommodations and other details promised have been delivered. This becomes another gray area for some because why tip the owner when you have already paid them for everything in full? Most hunters and sportsmen will agree that if the guide does everything in an A+ manner, it doesn’t matter if they own the company or not, they should still get the “thank you.”

When thinking about the prices, start with something easy. At a restaurant the approximate tip for your waiter/waitress is 15% (if the job is done well, of course). When it comes to the guide of your trip, most hunters begin in the neighborhood of 8-12% of the cost of the hunt when it comes to tipping the guide. (Example: For most waterfowl hunts that comes out to approximately $25 per day; for a 5-day big game hunt you are closer to the $250-$350 range. And if we are talking about a guide that has literally shown you and your guests a truly incredible week, then giving a little extra is definitely a good show.

Above all, remember the fact that the guide is not responsible for you shooting correctly, being able to “land that big one” right, and definitely are not responsible for anything that Mother Nature decides to throw in your path. Certain things will always be out of a human’s control, but hard work most definitely matters and should be appreciated. Just think, you may have such a successful expedition that you will want that particular guide the next time around, so saying “thank you” is a great way to start a long-standing relationship.

Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle

20 JVX Does it all for Saltwater Captain, TV Host

 

20 JVX Does it all for Saltwater Captain, TV Host

By Craig Lamb

Capt. Don Dingman has spent the past 30 years plying his trade in the coastal waters of Florida. About half of that time he’s fished from Alaska to Costa Rica and points in between, hosting his 15-season strong TV series.

Dingman, who guides clients and hosts Hook the Future TV on Sportsman Channel (and soon WFN and FOX Sports South), also knows a thing or two about boats.

His choice is the 20 JVX CC from Carolina Skiff. Dingman can fish from any boat he chooses and what follows is the top reason the 20 JVX is his choice.

“Versatility is what comes to mind over and over,” he said. “For one boat that can do it all in coastal waters, this is the one.”

Dingman has traversed oyster bars in 6 inches of water with a full load of tackle, anglers, and fuel. He’s enjoyed the Carolina-Skiff’s maneuverability and tight steering through mangroves to catch snook in the southwest Florida. He’s fished shallow inlets for big redfish along the Palm Coast, on the Atlantic side of the state. While fishing for spotted seatrout, the boat handled with ease the chop of Tampa Bay.

You just can’t beat it for an all around coastal boat,” he added. “The ride is just great and especially with a load.”

That load ranges from his fishing clients to the young guests of his show. The load also includes a cameraman and all of his gear when producing a TV show.

“With four people aboard, and all that gear, it still has the same top performance,” he said.

Dingman’s 20 JVX is rigged with a 75 h.p. Mercury FourStroke. Up front is a MotorGuide Great White 82 [owered by Odyssey Batteries. For anchoring in shallow water, he uses 8-foot Power-Pole Blades.

Dingman and discriminating coastal anglers and boaters choose the JVX Series for the same reasons. Those are dependability, reliability, performance and the tradition that goes with owning a Carolina Skiff.

A lightweight hull and modified V-hull design combine for a boat that will carry more, go further and faster with less horsepower.

You get excellent maneuverability and handling with the positive tracking keels. Patented splash guards provide the smooth, dry ride that Carolina Skiff has been known for after 30 years and counting in the business.

The biggest of the series is the 20 JVX. With a length overall of 20 feet and a beam of 78 inches, this boat can handle open water chop with tight maneuverability for running winding channels and backwaters. Weight overall is 1,230 pounds, and with a draft of about 4 inches, the 20 JVX is made for accessing shallow flats. A maximum horsepower rating of 90 H.P. makes the perfect setup for matching fuel economy with performance.

Contact Dingman at (904) 509-0026, or email captdon@hookthefuture.com.

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Terminally Well

 

Terminally Well  

By Capt. Gus Cane

Even the most expensive rods and reels are worthless without critical hardware. Catching coastal fish requires a wide variety of terminal tackle—the hooks, swivels, line, leader, crimps and other components that complete the rigs. You might be targeting a certain species. But in the briny, you never know what might show up so it pays to be fully prepared to capitalize on whatever opportunities might arise.

Obviously, line is needed on the reels. The choice between braid and monofilament is a personal one. Both have distinct advantages and disadvantages. Having multiple combos on board offers more flexibility and allows a quick switch from light to heavy if the situation calls for it. If space is limited, carry spare spools loaded with different line classes in case of a break-off, bird’s next or the need to scale up or down.

A similar situation exists with leader material. Multiple spools of different line strengths allow for fast changes. Monofilament leader works well for many applications. For super spooky fish or in clear water conditions, fluorocarbon leader is another option. Again, there are pros and cons to each leader type. Having a mix in the tackle bag will cover all bases. Toothy game fish like king, Spanish and cero mackerel, along with wahoo, barracuda, and sharks, often require the use of wire leader. Single-strand, coated and multi-strand cable are all handy depending on the circumstances. A mix will handle any variables.

The same holds true for an assortment of terminal tackle. Hooks come in multiple styles, sizes, and strengths. A thin-wire 1/0 circle hook nose-hooked to a small pinfish is a good match for a trophy seatrout. But that same hook would be way too light for feeding a palm-size pilchard to an 80-pound tarpon. Similarly, the treble hook on a six-inch surface popper just won’t work as a stinger hook on a kingfish rig. That’s why quantity, quality, and application are so important with terminal tackle. You could go through multiple rigs during a hot bite, and you certainly don’t want to run out or have the wrong stuff. Be prepared, and you’ll be ready for whatever you might encounter.

A good way to organize terminal tackle is by type and sometime species. Clear plastic tackle boxes with multiple (or adjustable) compartments allow loading by size or style. For example, keeping multiple sizes of swivels and crimps in one box allows a quick visual reference. Hooks and sinkers can be organized the same way. The boxes can be color coordinated or labeled with tape or magic marker. Loading several boxes in an open duffel bag makes them easier to tote.

Don’t forget the specialized terminal tackle items either. Plastic beads, copper wire, rubber tubing, dusters, dental floss, floats and balloons all have their place in special rigs. Don’t overlook the rigging tools as well. Pliers, crimpers, needles, deboners, bait knives, scissors and other accessories should be kept with the terminal tackle for quick access.

When you’re 30 miles offshore on a weed line loaded with gaffer dolphin, you don’t want to run out of the right hooks or rigs. Stock up and organize your terminal tackle and you won’t be disappointed.

Learn More Visit Yamaha Outboards.com Today.

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Cape Cod Deep Sea, Sport Fishing & Pleasure Cruises: The Dancing Squid Offers it All!

 

Cape Cod Deep Sea, Sport Fishing & Pleasure Cruises: The Dancing Squid Offers it All!

 

When any species of ‘fish’ is mentioned in the same sentence as the beautiful location of Cape Cod, everyone seems to drool. Half of that group are those who want to set out upon the water and catch something ‘this big’ to either mount on the wall or take a picture of that they can carry in their wallet to let all their friends know that they ‘landed’ a true treasure. The other half drool because they think of the stunning, delicious array of seafood that Cape Cod has to offer.

Cape Cod, seafood, Dancing Squid Sport Fishing, Cod, Haddock, Monkfish, Pollock, pleasure cruise, deep sea fishing, sport fishing

 

Looking for a guide to help you in Cape Cod? Look no further. The name is Dancing Squid Sport Fishing and the Captain of it all is Cape Cod’s own Cap’n Bill. Name a species you’re after: Seabass, Scup, Tautog, Squid, Fluke, Striper, Bluefish, Cod, Tuna, Shark…you name it, Cap’n Bill can bring you to it. An avid recreational and commercial fisherman his entire life, he went striper fishing for the first time at the age of nine and was literally ‘hooked’ after that.

 

Let’s start with the vessel. Parker 2520 XLD, Twin Yamaha 150 Outboards, cruises at 30 knots, with a live baitwell, sink and washdown. This is a boat that offers two Pilot stations: one in the wheelhouse, one on deck. Lowrance 10 inch sonar, radar, GPS on deck. Lowrance 12 inch touch with side scan sonar, radar and GPS in wheelhouse.

With a private head and outriggers for Tuna fishing, although only 25′, The Dancing Squid fishes like a much larger boat. Parker’s have a compact wheelhouse which leaves more deck space for guests, and should the weather permit, two people can fish on the bow.

 

Want to get on board for some Deep Sea Fishing? Trips begin in early May and end in early November. What you’re going after includes: Squid, Tautog (Blackfish), Seabass, Scup (Porgy), Fluke (Summer Flounder), Bluefish, Striped Bass, Cod, Haddock, Monkfish, and Pollock.

(You can head to the site for details on specific species, open seasons, state regulations, and catch limits.)

Cap’n Bill and crew provide all fishing equipment (poles, jigs, lures, weights, bait, etc.), but feel free to bring your own gear if that’s what brings you ‘luck’. Make sure to pack those warm clothes, comfortable shoes and rain gear because even though weather forecasts may be optimistic, Mother Nature in Cape Cod can be a little fickle at times. In other words, trips in May and October can be chilly.

Also bring your own food and beverages (alcoholic beverages permitted), but try to avoid bringing glass on the boat. Bring along those coolers and ice for your catch, and large Ziploc bags for your fillets. But if you flew in on vacation unprepared, just let the company know when you book your trip and they’ll do their very best to accommodate your needs.

Legal requirements mean that no more than 6 passengers can come aboard, and you’ll be a lot more comfortable with room to spread out if tour numbers are 4 or 5. When it comes to trip rates, if the target is: Squid, Tautog, Seabass, or Scup: ​4 Hours at $500; 5 Hours at $625; or, 6 Hours at $700.

 

​If focusing on either Striped Bass or Bluefish: 6 Hours at $675, and 8 Hours at $875.

 

If headed out for Fluke: 10 Hours at $875. It is also important to note that on these trips, Jumbo Seabass is normally caught as well.

 

If your target happens to be, Cod, Haddock, Monkfish, or Pollock: 12 Hours at $1125

 

And the company also offers combination trips for multiple species.

Oh…it is Sport Fishing you want? Not a problem at all. You can chum and drift for Sharks, including Mako, Blue, Porbeagle and Thresher. Or you can troll for Tuna, including Bluefin, Big Eye and Yellowfin. The sport fishing trips begin in late June and end in early November.

And, yes, last but certainly not least, you can book a Pleasure Cruise that is beyond a pleasure to experience.

 

There are many reasons to choose Cap’n Bill. Whether a novice or an avid fisherman, if you and your guests are interested in a great experience and fishing on a boat that is built for safety, speed, comfort, and adorned with state of the art electronics, then The Dancing Squid is the boat for you!

The Dancing Squid and Cap’n Bill guarantee that after experiencing Sport or Deep Sea fishing, or simply taking that amazing Pleasure Cruise with the family that you will be booking your next trip the second you return to the dock.

 

In other words, it’s time for Cape Cod. Let the drooling begin!

 

For more information, head to: http://dancingsquidsportfishing.com

Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle

Hook the Future TV Means What It Says

 

Hook the Future TV Means What It Says

By Craig Lamb

Capt. Don Dingman’s idea of hosting a TV fishing show with kids as guests were met with skepticism by a producer.

“He wanted me to follow a script, say all the right things, do this and do that,” recalled Dingman. “I wanted to be me, not someone else.”

Fifteen seasons later, and counting, Hook the Future is a mainstay of TV fishing shows.

Taking kids fishing is the fundamental theme. There is much more to the message conveyed by the hosts and guests. Youths play the starring role, and the fish are the co-stars. Dingman is somewhere in between, mentoring and instilling confidence in his guests.

“I am blessed to pass that on to the kids,” said Dingman.

Dingman and his guests fish all over the world, from Alaska to Guatemala. Skills range from first timers to avid anglers. The kids are front and center of everything from gearing up to landing the fish.

Not long after the show came on the air, Dingman experienced a life-changing event. That happened after the death of his son, Brian, who was 22 years old.

“My whole life changed, and I had to ask myself what I wanted to do with it,” he said.

The show theme remained the same with a renewed focus. Helping kids in need through the meaning of fishing became the angle.

“In this fast paced world you don’t stop to take in and appreciate what really matters,” he said. “After I lost Brian, I really developed a better sense of what is important, and it’s what I try to convey on the show.”

A result of what really mattered became the Hook the Future Foundation. It has helped Guatemalan children learn English, make improvements to schools there and more.

Dingman also spreads the good will of fishing at clinics sponsored by Carolina Skiff. This year about a dozen clinics are being held at boat and outdoor shows.

“Teaching the fundamentals of fishing and about tackle selection is a given,” said Dingman.

“What else we do is teach parents and guardians about getting involved in fishing, how it can instill confidence in kids, and make a lifelong connection between adults and children.”

Carolina Skiff is providing motivation for all of the above. Attend a clinic and sign up for the chance to win a 15 JV CC. The boat will include a tilt trailer and 25 h.p. Mercury FourStroke outboard.

Through it, all Dingman stays true to the core idea of the show. Taking kids fishing and instilling confidence in them.

“It’s not so much about the fish as it is the experience,” he explained. “It’s always about experiencing things, wildlife and nature, they’ve never before experienced.”

“Soaking in that moment, when you share it with someone like a kid still gives me chill bumps.”

There will be plenty of those moments coming up this season.

On Sportsman Channel, the show airs at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, 6 a.m. on Saturday and 4 p.m. on Sunday. All times EDT. Hook the Future premieres in July on World Fishing Network (WFN) and FOX Sports South in September.

Visit Carolina Skiff.com Today!

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com