Prince Charming Courts Sickly Next-Door Neighbor in Bittersweet Coming-of-Age Tale

 

Everything, Everything,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Amandla Stenburg, SCID, Anika Noni Rose, Nick RobinsonEverything, Everything

Film Review by Kam Williams

Prince Charming Courts Sickly Next-Door Neighbor in Bittersweet Coming-of-Age Tale

It’s Maddy Whittier’s (Amandla Stenburg) 18th birthday, but she won’t be celebrating the occasion at a party or restaurant. In fact, she won’t be leaving the house or even having friends over anytime soon.

That’s because she has SCID, a rare genetic disorder that basically makes her allergic to everything. Consequently, she’s been stuck inside a hermetically-sealed house since being diagnosed with the disease at the age of 3, shortly after her father and brother’s untimely deaths in a terrible car crash.

Lucky for Maddy, her mom, Pauline (Anika Noni Rose), is a physician who could afford to raise her in a luxurious, if sterile, environment free of the germs that could compromise her immune system in an instant. Although Maddy grew up curious about the outside world, she’s gotten used to exploring it over the internet with the help of online courses and a support group for kids with her sickness.

Then, Maddy receives the best birthday gift she could ever imagine when new neighbors move in right next-door. For, one member of the family, Olly (Nick Robinson), is a  boy about her own age. And all it takes is a glance through the glass window for the handsome hunk to fall head-over-heels in love with her.

Everything, Everything,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Amandla Stenburg, SCID, Anika Noni Rose, Nick Robinson

The ardent admirer uses sign language to ask Maddy for her phone number, before typing “U R beautiful” in his very first text. Olly’s zeal only increases upon learning about her crippling affliction, and he asks if there’s any way he could be decontaminated to come over for a visit.

But that’s against doctor’s orders, especially mom’s, which forces the lovebirds to admire each other from afar. Hormones raging, Maddy is suddenly discontent with her sheltered existence in an antiseptic gilded cage. 

Will she recklessly abandon the protective bubble to rush into the arms of a perfect Prince Charming she barely knows? That is the burning question at the heart of Everything, Everything, a bittersweet, bildungsroman based on the young adult novel by Nicola Yoon. The picture was directed by Stella Meghie who successfully adapted the book into a syrupy soap opera certain to satisfy fans of the source material.

A tender enough tearjerker to dehydrate even this crabby curmudgeon!

Excellent (4 stars)

Rated PG-13 for mature themes and brief sensuality

Running time: 96 minutes

Distributor: Warner Brothers Pictures

<br

Franchise’s Fourth Episode Features New Cast Up to Old Tricks

 

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul, Film Review by Kam Williams, kitchen sink comedy, disastrous road trip, Jason Drucker, Alicia Silverstone, Tom Everett ScottDiary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul

Film Review by Kam Williams

Franchise’s Fourth Episode Features New Cast Up to Old Tricks

According to Murphy’s Law, “Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.” And Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul provides cinematic support for that pessimistic principle. For, this kitchen sink comedy relies on the domino effect to exacerbate the ever-mounting misfortunes visited upon the beleaguered Heffley family over the course of one disastrous, summer road trip.

The film is the fourth in the series based on Jeff Kinney’s illustrated children’s novels. It was directed by David Bowers who also made Wimpy Kid 2 and 3.

It’s understandable that the youngsters from the original might have aged out of their roles, though it’s a bit of a surprise that the movie features an entirely new cast, starting with Jason Drucker as the title character, Wimpy Greg Heffley. Alicia Silverstone and Tom Everett Scott play his parents, Susan and Frank, while Charlie Wright and Dylan Walters assume the roles of his older and younger brothers, Rodrick and Manny, respectively.

The premise of Wimpy Kid 4 revolves around a cross-country family outing to attend grandma’s 90th birthday party. The catch is that Susan envisions the drive as an opportunity to share quality time, so she collects everybody’s cell phone devices before departing.

This frustrates her fidgety brood who prove clueless without electronic devices. So Rodrick calls her “the worst mom ever” and sticks a “kidnapped” sign in the rear window which leads to their being pulled over by the police.

Subsequent eventful stops range from an overnight stay in a motel with rats in the pool  to a visit to a country fair where Manny wins a live piglet as a prize. The humor flowing from the escalating insanity is mostly of the bodily function variety: with farts, feces, burps and barfing being real crowd-pleasers.

Every skit is designed to keep the target audience of tykes and tots in stitches, with only occasional asides for adults, such as the inspired homage to Psycho’s legendary shower scene.

Altogether, a delightfully-mindless diversion for the pre-teen demographic!

Very Good (3 stars)

Rated PG for rude humor

Running time: 91 minutes

Distributor: 20th Century Fox

Ridley Scott Delivers a Worthy Addition to the Sci-Fi, Horror Franchise

 

Alien: Covenant,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Ridley Scott, James Franco, Michael Fassbender,  blood-curdlingAlien: Covenant

Film Review by Kam Williams

Ridley Scott Delivers a Worthy Addition to the Sci-Fi, Horror Franchise

Alien: Covenant is the 9th episode in the enduring, sci-fi franchise launched back in 1979, provided you count the trio of Alien vs. Predator spinoffs. This installment is a sequel to Prometheus (2012) which devoted fans know was a prequel to the original. Covenant was directed by the legendary Ridley Scott who also made the first and the previous picture in the series.

As the futuristic tale unfolds, we find the spaceship Covenant hurtling through the ether on a mission  to colonize a distant star with its cargo of 2,000 cryogenic humans and 1,140 frozen embryos. The crew, under the command of Captain Jacob Branson (James Franco), is composed of seven couples plus a state-of-the-art android named Walter (Michael Fassbender).

Before they reach their destination, the vessel is damaged by a “shock wave generated by a neutrino burst from a solar flare,” whatever that pretentious, scientific jargon means. The upshot is that the accident conveniently dovetails with the arrival of mysterious radio signals that appear to be human in nature.

Curiosity gets the better of them, and they divert the crippled craft to the source of the transmissions, an uncharted planet nearby. Against their better judgment, they dispatch an expedition team to the surface to determine whether the place is habitable and might thus serve as a substitute settlement spot for their hibernating pod people.

Unfortunately, the intrepid explorers are blissfully unaware that they’re being contaminated by a monstrous, microscopic virus that can enter a body through any open orifice. After a brief gestation period, the opportunistic infection drains the hosts of their vitality while simultaneously morphing into the drooling, gelatinous, man-eating creatures long associated with the Alien adventures.

Alien: Covenant,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Ridley Scott, James Franco, Michael Fassbender,  blood-curdling

This doesn’t bode well for the Covenant, and what ensues is a high burn-rate affair in which crew members are gradually picked off one-by-one, with each succumbing to a demise a little more grisly than the last. To paraphrase, the franchise’s immortal, inaugural tagline: In space, no one can still hear you scream, or save you from a body-snatching chestburster either.

A blood-curdling sequel and worthy addition to the series certain to scare the living daylights out of you!

Excellent (4 stars)

Rated R for violence, profanity, sexuality, nudity and bloody images

Running time: 122 minutes

Distributor: 20th Century Fox

Schumer and Hawn Share Vacation from Hell in Hilarious Farce

 

Snatched

Film Review by Kam Williams

Schumer and Hawn Share Vacation from Hell in Hilarious Farce 

Emily Middleton (Amy Schumer) is just having one of those days. First, she’s fired from her sales job in a boutique for irresponsibly ignoring customers in order to try on outfits for herself. Second, her boyfriend (Randall Park) callously dumps her on the eve of their planned romantic getaway to Ecuador, stating, “You don’t have any direction in life.”

Snatched,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Amy Schumer, Randall Park, Goldie Hawn, Wanda Sykes, Joan Cusack

Then, she cries on the shoulder of her mother (Goldie Hawn) who only proceeds to rub salt in her wounds with, “Michael was the best you’ll ever do.” Nevertheless, against her better judgment, Emily invites her on the trip because the pre-paid  vacation package is non-refundable.

Trouble is, Linda is also highly-neurotic, a worrier who rarely leaves the house, let alone the country. Plus, she’s a helicopter mom, which means she’ll be hovering around Emily the whole time, and thus probably preventing her from meeting a new guy. In the end, Linda grudgingly agrees to step out of her comfort zone, and hastily packs for what ought to be an uneventful stay an exclusive resort in paradise, judging from the brochure.

That is the stock setup of Snatched, a screwball comedy far more entertaining than it might read on paper. For, while the script does unfold like a generic “Vacation from Hell” yarn, it’s actually way above average, since it’s executed by a stellar cast topped by a quartet of consummate comediennes.

The picture co-stars Amy Schumer and Goldie Hawn as the aforementioned mother-daughter at the center of the story. It also features a couple of veterans in scene stealers Wanda Sykes and Joan Cusack who make the most of their supporting roles.

The plot thickens soon after the protagonists land in Ecuador. First, Emily’s swept off her feet by a tall, dark and handsome stranger (Tom Bateman) she meets in a bar. The next morning, he lures them off the safe confines of the compound for what’s supposed to be an innocuous adventure of the countryside.

Snatched,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Amy Schumer, Randall Park, Goldie Hawn, Wanda Sykes, Joan Cusack

Next thing you know, the Middletons find themselves kidnapped by a ruthless gang led by the bloodthirsty Morgado (Oscar Jaenada) demanding $100, 000 ransom. Trouble is, the U.S. State Department could care less, and Emily’s brother Jeffrey (Ike Barinholtz) is an agoraphobic who couldn’t be counted on to come to the rescue.

Not to worry. The squabbling mother-daughter put aside their differences and rely on their wits to survive. Schumer, Hawn, Sykes and Cusack, all at the top of their game.

Pound-for-pound, the funniest film to be released in theaters this year!

Excellent (4 stars)

Rated R for sexuality, brief nudity, pervasive profanity and crude humor

Running time: 91 minutes

Production Studio: Chernin Entertainment

Distributor: 20th Century Fox

Anything Goes in Guy Ritchie’s Fanciful Reimagining of Classic Medieval Fable

 

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

Film Review by Kam Williams

Anything Goes in Guy Ritchie’s Fanciful Reimagining of Classic Medieval Fable 

Do you remember what happened to the Sherlock Holmes franchise in Guy Ritchie’s hands? The low-key, cerbral sleuth who solved mysteries with his intellect suddenly morphed into a flamboyant, two-fisted superhero as likely to rely on brains as brawn to solve a case.

Well brace yourself for a similar transformation with King Arthur: Legend of the Sword. Again, Ritchie makes a concession to the attention-deficit demographic in crafting a fanciful reimagining of the beloved epic that plays out more like a frenetic, action-packed video game than a classic medieval tale.

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Sherlock Holmes, Charlie Hunnam, Astrid Berges-Frisbey, Kamil Lemieszewski

Nonetheless, the good news is that the movie works, if all you’re looking for is to be entertained by an overblown summer blockbuster with an A-rating when it comes to state-of-the-art special f/x. And the characters even sport familiar names, from King Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) to Lady Guinevere (Astrid Berges-Frisbey) to Merlin the Magician (Kamil Lemieszewski). But I still defy anyone to make sense of this hyperactive adventure which abandons the British folklore upon which it’s ostensibly based in deference to a cinematic mandate for incessant stimulation. 

The picture’s rudimentary plot unfolds as follows.  At the point of departure, King Uther (Eric Bana) is assassinated at the behest of his power-hungry brother, Vortigern (Jude Law). Instead of ascending to the thrown, Arthur grows up a lowly street urchin, utterly oblivious of his royal bloodline until the moment, years later, he manages to pull the magical sword Excalibur out of a stone.

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Sherlock Holmes, Charlie Hunnam, Astrid Berges-Frisbey, Kamil Lemieszewski

Cognizant of his rendezvous with destiny, with the help of a big bird, an archer (Aidan Gillen), a black knight (Djimon Hounsou) and psychic Guinevere, Arthur embarks on an epic  quest to reclaim his birthright. And what an eye-popping spectacle it proves to be!

Guy, I like what you’ve done with the legend!

Very Good (3 stars)

Rated PG-13 for violence, action, suggestive content and brief profanity

Running time: 126 minutes

Distributor: Warner Brothers Pictures

Cynthia Nixon Delivers Exquisite Depiction of Poet Emily Dickinson

 

A Quiet Passion

Film Review by Kam Williams

Cynthia Nixon Delivers Exquisite Depiction of Poet Emily Dickinson   

Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) had less than a dozen of her 1,800 poems published, while she was still alive. Since she was only appreciated posthumously, it makes sense that a movie about her life might revolve around something other than the literary prowess that went unrecognized by her contemporaries.

A Quiet Passion,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Emily Dickinson, Terrence Davies, feminist abolitionist, melancholy mood piece,

In bring her story to the big screen, writer/director Terrence Davies (The Deep Blue Sea) wisely resisted the temptation to pore over the prolific scribe’s evocative verses in favor of plumbing the depths of her terribly tortured soul. The upshot of that endeavor is A Quiet Passion, an exquisite costume drama  alternately presenting the protagonist as an iconoclastic visionary and as a retiring recluse.

On the macro level, the socially-conscious production subtly suggests that the agnostic, feminist abolitionist was ahead of her time and withdrew from the world in response to being raised in an era when evangelism, slavery and male chauvinism were the order of the day. Meanwhile, on the micro level, the character-driven drama telescopes intensely on a fragile psyche ostensibly further crippled by a cloistered existence. 

As the film unfolds, we find Emily (played in her teens by Emma Bell, later as an adult by Cynthia Nixon) just finishing a frustrating freshman year at Mount Holyoke. She soon decides to drop out due to the pressure being unfairly exerted by the school’s president, Mary Lyon (Sara Vertongen), to conform to the outwardly pious practices dictated by the Christian revival movement. Introspective Emily rebels because she sees her relationship with God as a direct and personal matter as opposed to one demanding public displays of devotion at church services.

So, she returns to Amherst, Massachusetts, where she again takes up residence on the grounds of the Dickinson family estate inhabited by her parents (Keith Carradine and Joanna Bacon), brother (Duncan Duff) and sister (Jennifer Ehle). Unfortunately, headstrong Emily proves unable to bite her tongue when visitors like the local pastor (Miles Richardson) or even a potential suitor (Stefan Menaul) come a callin’.

Although she does eventually make trusted confidantes of her sister-in-law Susan (Jodhi May) and the equally-irreverent Mabel Loomis Todd (Noemie Schellens), her preference remains the solitude of the remote, upstairs bedroom which affords her the opportunity to craft her immortal poems in secret. Cynthia Nixon has never been more convincing than conveying the emotional fires simmering just beneath the surface of such a stoic countenance.

A melancholy mood piece for the ages!

Excellent (4 stars)

Rated PG-13 for mature themes, disturbing images and suggestive material

Production Studio: Hurricane Films

Running time: 126 minutes

Distributor: Music Box Films

Military Misfits Take Shot at Redemption in High Body-Count Splatterfest

 

Black Site Delta,  Film Review by Kam Williams, The Dirty Dozen, gratuitous snuff flick, Cam Gigandet, Benjamin Charles WatsonBlack Site Delta

Film Review by Kam Williams

Military Misfits Take Shot at Redemption in High Body-Count Splatterfest   

Black Site Delta is a micro-budget production most reminiscent of The Dirty Dozen (1967). Like that classic action flick, the action-oriented tale of redemption revolves around the patriotic exploits of a rag-tag team of convicts.

However, given the film’s financial constraints, it features a team of 6 instead of 12 protagonists. They are led by Jake (Cam Gigandet), a vet suffering from PTSD who, at the point of departure, lands in a military prison following a bar fight. He soon discovers that the place doubles as a black site kept off the radar of the general public.

His fellow inmates are other disgraced soldiers, such as Simms (Benjamin Charles Watson), a former drone pilot incarcerated for refusing to drop a bomb on a terrorist at  a child’s birthday party full of kids. Truth be told, the facility has been hijacked to secretly serve as the command center for a treasonous operation employing a weapon of mass destruction.

Black Site Delta,  Film Review by Kam Williams, The Dirty Dozen, gratuitous snuff flick, Cam Gigandet, Benjamin Charles Watson

Apparently, one Colonel Irving (Michael Dale) has gone rogue and is now doing the bidding of an Afghan warlord named Khan (Arash Mokhtar). Once that fact comes to light, Jake recruits Simms, his love interest Vasquez (Teri Reeves), and a few other cellmates with the hope that their heroics might lead to full pardons. What ensues is a  spectacular splatterfest worthy of John Woo or Sam Peckinpah.

Thus unfolds Black Site Delta, a gratuitous snuff flick laced with lots of gory kill shots. The movie marks the directorial debut of Jesse Gustafson who does a decent enough job to satiate the bloodlust of fans of the high body-count genre.

A “Dirty Half-Dozen,” tailor-made for folks who appreciate scene after scene of incessant slaughter. 

Good (2 stars)

Unrated

Running time: 86 minutes

Distributor:.XLrator Media

Source:  GIG News

Abductee Seeks to Escape Kidnappers in Mindbending Sci-fi Thriller

 

Rupture

Film Review by Kam Williams

Abductee Seeks to Escape Kidnappers in Mindbending Sci-fi Thriller

Renee (Noomi Rapace) was leading an unremarkable existence in suburban Kansas City the day she was abducted by five strangers after her car broke down. Until then, she was just an average divorcee’ doing her best to shield a young son (Percy Hynes White) from an embittered ex-husband’s (Paul Popowich) vicious barbs.

https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/rupture_2017#&gid=1&pid=n-1547139

 

Otherwise, her routine was so drab, between work and helping Evan with his homework, that she decided to add a little spice to her life via skydiving. Then, hours before she got a chance to jump out of a plane as planned, she’s kidnapped by the aforementioned quintet with an unspoken agenda.

After being tasered, handcuffed and taped over the mouth, Renee was transported in the back of a panel truck to an unknown location. As she was rolled into the facility while lying on a gurney, she passes another captive who ominously warns, “They need us!”

Soon, Renee’s chained down in a cell where she finds herself being interrogated by jailers who obviously already know a lot about her, like the fact that she has a son and a terrible fear of spiders. However, they refuse to reveal why she’s been taken hostage.

Luckily, the fellow in the very next cell (Jonathan Potts) is willing to share what little he knows, once their torturers are out of earshot. He whispers that there are about 20 other inmates and he also cryptically makes reference to “G-10-12-X,” whatever that means.

Rupture,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Noomi Rapace,  mindbending, sci-fi thriller

That is the intriguing point of departure for Rupture, a mindbending, sci-fi thriller directed and co-written by Steven Shainberg (Secretary). While the setup is kinda cool, unfortunately, the picture unfolds like your typical M. Night Shyamalan production whose mystery is ultimately resolved by a rabbit out of the hat resolution.

Getting there is all the fun in this paint-by-numbers affair which has the ingenious heroine resorting to one of the oldest cinematic cliches by escaping via the ventilation system. Just don’t let anyone spoil the conclusion, or you’ll have no reason to check out this hackneyed horror yarn co-starring Peter Stormare, Kerry Bishe’ and Michael Chiklis.

They’re coming to take me away, ha-ha!

Fair (1.5 stars)

Unrated

Running time: 101 minutes

Distributor: AMBI Media Group

“br>

Kitchen Sink Comedy Chronicles Cutthroat Rivalry between Neighboring New Orleans Barbershops

 

N.O.L.A. Circus

Film Review by Kam Williams

Kitchen Sink Comedy Chronicles Cutthroat Rivalry between Neighboring New Orleans Barbershops

Will (Martin Bradford) is the proprietor of Kupcakes, a hair salon located in Algiers, the only New Orleans parish on the west side of the Mississippi River. What makes him unique is that he’s also a grassroots activist who periodically stands on the proverbial soap box, preaching to anybody who’ll listen about Rosa Parks and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

N.O.L.A. Circus,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Martin Bradford, Politically-incorrect, crassploitation fare strictly for the unshockable

He only has one employee, Nola (Jessica Morali), a gorgeous shampoo girl. They are secretly lovers, too, only because she has a very overprotective brother, Denzel (Reginal Varice), who is driven beserk just by the thought of her sleeping with anybody.

For example, he went crazy and beat up the entire staff at Napoli’s Pizzeria, when he suspected the owner of sleeping with her. Gesuippe Napoli (Ricky Wayne) was so incensed by the pummeling that he’s summoned a hit man from Sicily (Gianni Boromei) to knock off the perpetrator.       

Meanwhile, right across the street from Kupcakes we find Marvin’s, an old-fashioned barbershop frequented by a colorful cast of characters. The place is run by Marvin (Vas Blackwood) and his two brothers, Hathi (Corey Mendell Parker) and Anaconda (Nicoye Banks).

Each of the siblings has a distinctive physical trait. Marvin has a huge Afro, Hathi has big ears, and Anaconda was blessed with gargantuan genitalia, hence the nickname. And he’s a sex addict dating Nola’s BFF, Karen (Kamille McCuin). Karen is the neighborhood drug dealer, not to be confused with another hustler who lurks around, pressuring passersby to purchase everything from watches to underwear.

N.O.L.A. Circus,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Martin Bradford, Politically-incorrect, crassploitation fare strictly for the unshockable

Additional players in this theater of the absurd include Woody (Lucius Baston), an aspiring opera singer who only stutters when he speaks, and a a trio of hooded Ku Klux Klansmen threatening to kill Will unless he stops the pontificating in favor of civil rights.

All of the above are afforded their moments to shine in N.O.L.A. Circus, a kitchen sink comedy written and directed by Luc Annest. The foul-mouthed Frenchman is apparently unaware of contemporary social trends, since his irreverent film debut arrives laced with profanity, ethnic slurs, misogyny and assorted other salacious material ostensibly intended to easily offend.

The picture relies on a preposterous plot somewhat redeemed by the fact that the outrageous antics onscreen are often hilarious. So, don’t be surprised if you end up laughing in spite of yourself.

Politically-incorrect, crassploitation fare strictly for the unshockable!

Very Good (2.5 stars)

Unrated

Running time: 89 minutes

Distributor: XLrator Media

WWI Saga Revolves around Love Triangle in the Midst of Ethnic Cleansing

 

The Promise

Film Review by Kam Williams

WWI Saga Revolves around Love Triangle in the Midst of Ethnic Cleansing

It’s Eastern Turkey in 1914, which is where we find druggist Mikael Boghosian (Oscar Isaac) applying his trade in his half-Armenian/half-Turkish village where Christians and Muslims get along swell. The ambitious, young apothecary would really rather be a doctor, so he strategically courts a neighbor (Angela Sarafyan) from a relatively-wealthy family just for the dowry.

Oscar Isaac as Michael Boghosian in The Promise. Photo Credit: Jose Haro

Those 400 gold coins do enable him to afford med school. However, while studying in Constantinople, he falls head-over-heels for Ana (Charlotte Le Bon), a fellow Armenian recently repatriated from France. The country bumpkin is taken not only with her pulchritude but with her urbane sophistication ostensibly cultivated over the course of a childhood spent in Paris. Trouble is, Ana has returned accompanied by her lover, Chris Meyers (Christian Bale), an intrepid, American photojournalist assigned by the Associated Press to find evidence of ethnic cleansing.

The Promise,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Oscar Isaac, Angela Sarafyan, Muslim, Armenian, ethnic cleansing, heroism

Charlotte Le Bon as Ana Khesarian and Christian Bale as Chris Myers in The Promise. Directed by Terry George. Photo Credit: Jose Haro

The plot thickens when World War I erupts. Instead of pursuing Ana and his M.D., Mikael finds himself fleeing the roundup of innocent Armenian civilians by the Turkish army. He makes his way back to his tiny hometown to rescue relatives and friends. Meanwhile, Ana is in a similar struggle to survive, and her beau does his best to shoot proof of the savage slaughter rumored to be transpiring.   

That is the dire set of circumstances established at the outset of The Promise, a riveting docudrama directed and co-written by Oscar-winner Terry George (The Short).  The edge-of-your-seat thriller bears an uncanny resemblance to Hotel Rwanda, which George directed and co-wrote, too.

The Promise,  Film Review by Kam Williams, Oscar Isaac, Angela Sarafyan, Muslim, Armenian, ethnic cleansing, heroism

For both of these films chronicle extraordinary exhibitions of heroism in the face of a complete collapse of civilization. If this picture has a flaw, it’s that it appears to be trivializing the ethnic cleansing of one and a half million Armenians when it asks that holocaust to serve as a mere backdrop to the love story at the center of the saga.

That being said, I nevertheless invested in the characters emotionally, and ended up teary-eyed during the denouement. War may be hell, but luckily, love still conquers all!

Excellent (3.5 stars)

Rated PG-13 for mature themes, sexuality, violence, disturbing images and war atrocities

Running time: 134 minutes

Production Studio: Survival Pictures

Distributor: Open Road Films

Source:  GIG News