How to Build and Fish a Crappie Condo

 

How to Build and Fish a Crappie Condo

When warm weather hits, the crappie start biting. Depending on the region, after the spawn around April or May till the first cold front rolls through in the Fall, these tasty panfish are easy to find, usually congregating around brush piles that house the plankton and baitfish that make up the food chain. Although, anglers can spend a long time with their DownScan sonar looking for the ideal spot, many anglers are making their own brush piles, so they know exactly where to look.

In reality, anything will work as a brush pile – in many areas, anglers bundle together Christmas trees and weigh them down. The key to placement is depth. When the temperature climbs, crappie will move into deeper water. The ideal depth range is between 10 and 30 feet. Even government agencies like Fish and Wildlife, the Army Corps of Engineers and The National Park Service are involved in placing brush piles to offer the fish a comfortable and safe habitat — though they want to keep them in water deep enough so that they don’t become hazards to navigation. The problem with using trees and brush is that they eventually break down and have to be replaced after a few years. Additionally, hooks can snag on the limbs making it a challenge to fish.

Barry Stokes from FOX Sports Outdoors has found a great way to create manmade brush piles that won’t snag hooks and will last forever. Made with PVC pipe, recycled tubing, concrete and a bucket, Stokes’ crappie condos are just about guaranteed to catch fish when you know how to work them right. Typically, he places six to twelve in a clump five feet apart, and within a week the crappie will be in residence. The longer they sit in the water, the more algae grow, and the more life surrounds them.

When placing a brush pile, marking the location on a chart is vital to help find them once again. On 2D sonar, a brush pile will just appear to be a blob, but with the latest Lowrance DownScan sonar technology, the brush pile not only comes to life, but even the fish hiding in the tangle of PVC pipes become apparent.

According to Stokes, the best way to work the brush pile is to have an HDI transducer on your trolling motor. You want to be directly over of the brush pile with the transducer right under you. Using a vertical presentation, you lower down a jig. Stokes recommends 3/16 ounce as the heaviest weight with six- or eight-pound test line. You’ll have to experiment with depth, but once you get a bite, you can just keep dropping the jig to catch more fish. After a few catches, however, the crappie will get anxious and back off. If you are in a spot with a few brush piles grouped together, you can troll over to the next one and work them in sequence. By the time you get back to the first one, the spooked fish will have returned. If you have only a limited number of brush piles to work, you can also just back away with your trolling motor and cast from a distance. Using a lighter weight in the 1/8-to-1/24 ounce range when casting from a distance is preferred. This technique will draw out the fish that have been hiding.

To see how Barry built his crappie condos, watch the video here: http://foxsportsoutdoors.com/videos-main-page/search/condos/

Catch all the of the action from Barry Stokes and the team at FOX Sports Outdoors on FOX Sports Southwest, FOX Sports Southeast, Waypoint TV and on FOXSportsoutdoors.com.

Learn More: Visit Lowrance.com Today.

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Yamaha F90 Outboard Named One of Boating Industry®’s 2017 Top Products

 

Yamaha F90 Outboard Named One of Boating Industry®’s 2017 Top Products

THIRD CONSECUTIVE YEAR FOR RECOGNITION FOR YAMAHA OUTBOARDS

Yamaha Marine Group announced today that its new F90 outboard has been named one of Boating Industry’s® 2017 Top Products. The publication’s fourth annual Top Products list was published in the May edition of Boating Industry®magazine. This is the third consecutive year that Yamaha Outboards has made the list.

“This year, we’ve selected 50 of the best new or updated products and services for the marine industry, ranging from accessories to boats to engines and more,” said Boating Industry® editor in chief Jonathan Sweet. “To be eligible, products had to have been introduced or significantly updated since January 2016. From hundreds of nominations, the top products stood out for impact on the industry, innovation and how they advance their product category – or create a new segment.”

“We are honored that the F90 has been recognized amongst Boating Industry’s®Top Products for 2017,” said Dale Barnes, Division Manager, Marketing, Yamaha Marine Group. “The all-new F90 leads its class in torque and acceleration, and the improvements made to this outboard make it a great choice for a variety of boats.”

The new F90 employs a single overhead camshaft to drive four valves per cylinder, which saves weight while increasing volumetric efficiency – and makes more power. Weighing in at 353 pounds, the F90 is thirteen pounds lighter than its predecessor and displaces 1.8 liters versus 1.6 liters.

The F90 is not just quicker, it’s also quieter, which means a better boating and fishing experience for consumers. The outboard can be paired with several Yamaha propellers with the exclusive Shift Dampener System™ (SDS™), including Talon® (GP and Pontoon), for even greater quiet and comfort.

The F90 is compatible with Yamaha’s Variable Trolling RPM Switch

(VTS®) for slow trolling and better fishing. It can be rigged for use with Yamaha’s award-winning multifunction tiller handle, and features improved charging, with 35 amps of power over the previous 25 amps. The F90 is also compatible with Yamaha’s Command Link® 6Y8 and 6YC digital gauges, as well as Yamaha’s Y-COP®, for increased theft protection and security.

Yamaha Marine products are marketed throughout the United States and around the world. Yamaha Marine Group, based in Kennesaw, Ga., supports its 2,000 U.S. dealers and boat builders with marketing, training and parts for Yamaha’s full line of products and strives to be the industry leader in reliability, technology and customer service. Yamaha Marine is the only outboard brand to have earned NMMA®’s C.S.I. Customer Satisfaction Index award every year since its inception. Visit www.yamahaoutboards.com.

This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only and are not intended to be an endorsement.

Original Source: Yamaha Outboards.com

Hook the Future TV Means What It Says

 

Hook the Future TV Means What It Says

By Craig Lamb

Capt. Don Dingman’s idea of hosting a TV fishing show with kids as guests were met with skepticism by a producer.

“He wanted me to follow a script, say all the right things, do this and do that,” recalled Dingman. “I wanted to be me, not someone else.”

Fifteen seasons later, and counting, Hook the Future is a mainstay of TV fishing shows.

Taking kids fishing is the fundamental theme. There is much more to the message conveyed by the hosts and guests. Youths play the starring role, and the fish are the co-stars. Dingman is somewhere in between, mentoring and instilling confidence in his guests.

“I am blessed to pass that on to the kids,” said Dingman.

Dingman and his guests fish all over the world, from Alaska to Guatemala. Skills range from first timers to avid anglers. The kids are front and center of everything from gearing up to landing the fish.

Not long after the show came on the air, Dingman experienced a life-changing event. That happened after the death of his son, Brian, who was 22 years old.

“My whole life changed, and I had to ask myself what I wanted to do with it,” he said.

The show theme remained the same with a renewed focus. Helping kids in need through the meaning of fishing became the angle.

“In this fast paced world you don’t stop to take in and appreciate what really matters,” he said. “After I lost Brian, I really developed a better sense of what is important, and it’s what I try to convey on the show.”

A result of what really mattered became the Hook the Future Foundation. It has helped Guatemalan children learn English, make improvements to schools there and more.

Dingman also spreads the good will of fishing at clinics sponsored by Carolina Skiff. This year about a dozen clinics are being held at boat and outdoor shows.

“Teaching the fundamentals of fishing and about tackle selection is a given,” said Dingman.

“What else we do is teach parents and guardians about getting involved in fishing, how it can instill confidence in kids, and make a lifelong connection between adults and children.”

Carolina Skiff is providing motivation for all of the above. Attend a clinic and sign up for the chance to win a 15 JV CC. The boat will include a tilt trailer and 25 h.p. Mercury FourStroke outboard.

Through it, all Dingman stays true to the core idea of the show. Taking kids fishing and instilling confidence in them.

“It’s not so much about the fish as it is the experience,” he explained. “It’s always about experiencing things, wildlife and nature, they’ve never before experienced.”

“Soaking in that moment, when you share it with someone like a kid still gives me chill bumps.”

There will be plenty of those moments coming up this season.

On Sportsman Channel, the show airs at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, 6 a.m. on Saturday and 4 p.m. on Sunday. All times EDT. Hook the Future premieres in July on World Fishing Network (WFN) and FOX Sports South in September.

Visit Carolina Skiff.com Today!

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com