Finding Bass During a Mixed Spawn Season

 

Finding Bass During a Mixed Spawn Season

Yamaha Pro Mark Davis Offers Two Solutions For Catching Bass This Spring

Warmer-than-normal winter temperatures have shuffled bass spawning schedules on many lakes throughout the country this spring, but Mark Davis has seen it before, and the veteran Yamaha Pro knows just how to approach the problem.

“With the milder winter, bass began spawning much earlier than usual this year so when a fisherman heads to a lake this month, he’s probably going to find some bass in post-spawn, others on spawning beds, and even a few still in the pre-spawn stage,” notes Davis, a three-time B.A.S.S.® Angler of the Year and winner of the 1993 Bassmaster Classic.® “The fish are doing a lot of different things, but not a lot of them are doing the same thing.

“It’s a real curve ball, because some bass may be in water only a foot deep while others can be in water 20 feet deep, and the rest of them are somewhere in between.”

The first solution Davis offers for catching some of these fish is for an angler to simply begin fishing the way he wants to fish, using the lures and techniques in which he has the most confidence. 

He should decide which type of spawning fish he wants to catch, choose an area of the lake where that is likely to be happening, and then concentrate entirely on those fish. For example, if he prefers to go after post-spawn bass, Davis suggests looking for slightly deeper water in the 15 to 20-foot range and fishing a deep diving crankbait, a football head jig, or a Carolina rig and staying in that area of a lake.

“If you decide on this approach, you really need to forget about any shallow water bass,” emphasizes the Yamaha Pro, “because if you don’t commit totally to what you’re doing, you’ll never fish as effectively as you need to. Just remember, you’re probably not going to find a lot of bass because they’re so scattered.”

Davis describes his second, completely opposite solution as “junk fishing,” in which a fisherman does work both shallow and deep water. If he sees a potential shallow water target, he can cast to it, then turn and make his next cast toward standing timber in deeper water. He might follow with a third cast ahead of the boat to still another spot. Junk fishing usually involves a lot of running to different places, and it frequently means fishing entirely new water each day. This spring, it’s been a technique used by many of the tournament pros in both Bassmaster® and FLW® events.

“This is how I fished the recent Bassmaster® Elite tournament at Toledo Bend,” Davis admits. “I started the tournament in deep water looking for post-spawn bass, and I caught 24 keepers the first day, but all of them were small fish, and I only weighed in about 12 pounds. You can’t even place in a Toledo Bend event with weights like that, so I changed completely. The rest of the tournament I junk-fished water down to about 10 feet, working shallow for spawning and pre-spawn bass, and I eventually finished 36th overall.

“It wasn’t the way I wanted to fish, but on Toledo Bend, there is a huge bass population, so I actually moved up in the standings each day. On lakes that don’t have a large population of fish, a spring like the one we’re having now can really make fishing difficult.”

Another part of the problem, adds Davis, is the increased fishing pressure bass are receiving now, which also makes them more difficult to catch. Because fish are seeing more lures than ever before, and many are being caught and released multiple times, anglers need to remember to keep trying different lures and retrieves until some combination starts bringing strikes. 

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Original Source; Yamaha Outboards.com 

Get the Right Gaff!

 

Get the Right Gaff!

By Capt. Gus Cane

Nets work well for handling smaller inshore species, but for big, powerful adversaries gaffs are the preferred tool for landing fish. There are several sizes, lengths and even styles of gaffs though, so getting the right one is important.

Gaffs handles are usually made of aluminum or fiberglass. The hook end of the shaft is often tapered for less resistance in the water. The butt end is thicker for extra strength and has a plastic or EVA foam grip for better retention with wet hands. The hook itself is stainless steel of various gauges depending on the size and type. A rounded bend hook is the most popular, although diamond-shaped hooks are becoming more common. When considering shaft lengths, take into account the height of the boat’s gunwales above the waterline. Shorter lengths offer better control, while longer ones reduce the reach. Storage aboard the boat when the gaff is not in use is another consideration before purchasing.

For smaller sized fish like schoolie kingfish or dolphin, a 2-inch hook on a 4- to 6-foot shaft gaff is a good choice. The hook’s gape or the distance between the hook point and shaft or handle should match the approximate depth of the fish’s body being landed. The smaller the gauge of hook, the easier it will penetrate. A 3-inch gaff will handle fish up to 50 pounds or so, while a 4-inch gaff is designed for big broad fish like tuna and sharks up to 250 pounds. Keep in mind more than one gaff may be needed to swing fish of that size aboard.

Specialty Gaffs are designed for specific purposes. Tournament king mackerel anglers prefer 12-foot long 3-inch gaffs to make sure “smokers” don’t get away. Flying gaffs are heavy-duty versions with large gape hooks that detach from the handle. A rope is tied to a reinforced cleat on the boat, and once the fish is gaffed, the hook pulls free, yet the rope keeps the trophy tethered. Flying gaffs are mostly used for marlin, tuna and large pelagic sharks like makos or threshers.

Gaffing requires timing, steady nerves and lots of practice. Veteran gaff men make sure the hook point is facing down and towards the boat as the fish is brought alongside to avoid breaking the line. It’s best to aim the hook point towards the head for better control and not ruin the meat. After the fish is gaffed, the angler should back off the reel drag or switch to the clicker mechanism to prevent line overruns if the fish takes off again. Communication between the angler and the gaff man is critical too. The angler shouldn’t pull the fish’s head out of the water, while the gaffer must wait patiently for a clean shot. With the proper timing and deft moves, even the largest prey can be gaffed, subdued and brought safely aboard.

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com today.

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Yamaha Marine Endorses Ocean Debris Cleanup Bill

 

Yamaha Marine Endorses Ocean Debris Cleanup Bill
SAVE OUR SEAS ACT IS GOOD FOR BOATERS, ANGLERS, AND COASTAL COMMUNITIES

Yamaha Marine Group today announced its endorsement of S. 756, the bipartisan Save Our Seas Act, which was introduced in the U.S. Senate by Senators Dan Sullivan (R-AK), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), and Cory Booker (D-NJ.)  The bill aims to strengthen research and international coordination of anti-debris efforts to protect America’s oceans, coastlines, and inland waterways.  In addition to reauthorizing the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA®) Marine Debris Program, the bill allows for additional funding to assist with debris cleanup, and encourages the executive branch to engage with the nations responsible for the majority of marine debris.

sea polluted with plastic garbage

“When Senator Sullivan told us about the Save Our Seas Act in mid-March, we were eager to support it,” said Martin Peters, Senior Manager, Government Relations, Yamaha Marine Group. “Keeping America’s oceans and waterways clean is very important to boaters and anglers, and we encourage the entire industry to send letters in support of this bill to their Congressmen through Yamaha Marine Advocacy or BassforSalt.com.”

Boaters and anglers are encouraged to send prewritten letters of support to their legislators through Bass Anglers for Saltwater Conservation, which can be found at BassforSalt.com.

The Save Our Seas Act was unanimously passed out of the Senate Commerce Committee on April 5, 2017, and now awaits action on the Senate floor. It has also been endorsed by Senators Chris Coons (D-DE), Jim Inhofe (R-OK), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Gary Peters (D-MI), and Thom Tillis (R-NC.)

“The Charm of Fishing is that it is the pursuit of what is elusive but attainable, a perpetual series of occasions for hope” John Buchan

Yamaha Marine products are marketed throughout the United States and around the world. Yamaha Marine Group, based in Kennesaw, Ga., supports its 2,000 U.S. dealers and boat builders with marketing, training and parts for Yamaha’s full line of products and strives to be the industry leader in reliability, technology and customer service. Yamaha Marine is the only outboard brand to have earned NMMA®’s C.S.I. Customer Satisfaction Index award every year since its inception. Visit www.yamahaoutboards.com.

This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only and are not intended to be an endorsement. * Helm Master available on select new twin, triple and quad Yamaha outboards installed on new boat packages manufactured by participating boat builders and sold by authorized dealers only.

Original Source:  Yamaha Outboards.com 

Yamaha F90 Outboard Named One of Boating Industry®’s 2017 Top Products

 

Yamaha F90 Outboard Named One of Boating Industry®’s 2017 Top Products

THIRD CONSECUTIVE YEAR FOR RECOGNITION FOR YAMAHA OUTBOARDS

Yamaha Marine Group announced today that its new F90 outboard has been named one of Boating Industry’s® 2017 Top Products. The publication’s fourth annual Top Products list was published in the May edition of Boating Industry®magazine. This is the third consecutive year that Yamaha Outboards has made the list.

“This year, we’ve selected 50 of the best new or updated products and services for the marine industry, ranging from accessories to boats to engines and more,” said Boating Industry® editor in chief Jonathan Sweet. “To be eligible, products had to have been introduced or significantly updated since January 2016. From hundreds of nominations, the top products stood out for impact on the industry, innovation and how they advance their product category – or create a new segment.”

“We are honored that the F90 has been recognized amongst Boating Industry’s®Top Products for 2017,” said Dale Barnes, Division Manager, Marketing, Yamaha Marine Group. “The all-new F90 leads its class in torque and acceleration, and the improvements made to this outboard make it a great choice for a variety of boats.”

The new F90 employs a single overhead camshaft to drive four valves per cylinder, which saves weight while increasing volumetric efficiency – and makes more power. Weighing in at 353 pounds, the F90 is thirteen pounds lighter than its predecessor and displaces 1.8 liters versus 1.6 liters.

The F90 is not just quicker, it’s also quieter, which means a better boating and fishing experience for consumers. The outboard can be paired with several Yamaha propellers with the exclusive Shift Dampener System™ (SDS™), including Talon® (GP and Pontoon), for even greater quiet and comfort.

The F90 is compatible with Yamaha’s Variable Trolling RPM Switch

(VTS®) for slow trolling and better fishing. It can be rigged for use with Yamaha’s award-winning multifunction tiller handle, and features improved charging, with 35 amps of power over the previous 25 amps. The F90 is also compatible with Yamaha’s Command Link® 6Y8 and 6YC digital gauges, as well as Yamaha’s Y-COP®, for increased theft protection and security.

Yamaha Marine products are marketed throughout the United States and around the world. Yamaha Marine Group, based in Kennesaw, Ga., supports its 2,000 U.S. dealers and boat builders with marketing, training and parts for Yamaha’s full line of products and strives to be the industry leader in reliability, technology and customer service. Yamaha Marine is the only outboard brand to have earned NMMA®’s C.S.I. Customer Satisfaction Index award every year since its inception. Visit www.yamahaoutboards.com.

This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only and are not intended to be an endorsement.

Original Source: Yamaha Outboards.com

Bait Magnets

 

Bait Magnets

By Capt. Gus Cane

Live bait enthusiasts know you can never have too much bait on board and one of the fastest ways to “black out” a live well is by chumming. Several methods are effective, but soaking frozen blocks of chum is the most popular.

Available at tackle shops and marinas, frozen chum typically consists of ground-up menhaden or shrimp trawl by-catch. It usually comes in 6-pound blocks in wax-paper boxes. The block slips easily into nylon bags with mesh openings from 1/4 to 3/8 inch and a drawstring closure. To activate, simply lower the bag into the water, give it several good shakes to start the flow and tie the bag off on a boat cleat. The current and occasional shake will do the rest. Before stashing the container box in a bucket or hatch, dip it in the water to remove any residue and add to the slick.

As the chum starts to thaw, oil and tiny particles (scales, bits of flesh, skin) will slowly drift behind the boat in the current, forming a noticeable slick on the water’s surface. The combination will soon attract different kinds of bait depending on the water depth and location. Pinfish, blue runners, ballyhoo, pilchards, herring, and sardines are the prime baits attracted by the chum. Once the bait arrives, small jigs, Sabiki® rigs or a cast net can be used to gather the bounty.

Dry commercial chum, typically menhaden pellets in burlap bags, is another alternative. Dry Chum is vacuum-bagged and can be stored indefinitely, so there’s less mess and waste.

Some anglers prefer to make their own chum using ground-up fish carcasses and frozen menhaden or mackerel. A grinder mounted to plate and placed in a stern rod holder can pulverize this raw or frozen concoction directly overboard. Although more labor-intensive than soaking the frozen blocks, this method does work well. There are also products like the chum churn.  that hangs over the side. The long slender tube is filled with fish parts, and the internal blades chop and dice as the handle is pumped.

Do-it-yourself frozen blocks aren’t difficult to make either if a large chest freezer is available. Dry cat food or oatmeal soaked with water and generous splashes of menhaden oil can be poured into quart-size plastic zip bags and frozen. On the water, put them in a mesh bag and soak over the side just like the store-bought blocks.

Mesh chum bags can be bought in bulk and then thrown away after the trip. If you prefer to recycle, however, tie the empty bag off the transom cleat, so it dangles in the water on the run back in. The waves and splashes will scour it clean for the next time you want to chum for bait.

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com Today!

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Louisiana’s Best-Kept Fishing Secret is Offshore

 

Louisiana’s Best-Kept Fishing Secret is Offshore

By Craig Lamb

Go to New Orleans for the obvious reasons. Jazz, food, the French and Cajun-infused culture. Drive 2 hours south and arrive at a completely different world. Here you will encounter some of the world’s best saltwater fishing that begins in Grand Isle.

Located on a barrier island of the same name, Grand Isle is a remote oasis where the mainland ends and the Gulf of Mexico begins. What makes it so productive for fishing is the nutrient-rich flow of the Mississippi River. The mouth of the river is not far away.

All those reasons explain why Grand Isle is the hub of saltwater fishing for South Louisiana and the Gulf Coast. Every saltwater fish known to man is found here. And in size and abundance. Pull up near a deepwater oil rig, toss a live bait rig or cast a lure and hang on. What’s on the other end of the line you won’t know until it breaks the surface or nears the boat.

Capt. Lance Walker grew up here. Like his grandfather and uncle, Walker and his family owned fishing camps around Grand Isle. Walker has spent a lifetime on the water and over a decade ago started Fish Commander Charters.

“I’ve always said that if you are making a living doing something you love, then you must be doing something right.”

Walker spends over 150 days a year guiding his clients and taking them to world-class waters filled with tuna, snapper, grouper, amberjack, cobia, king mackerel, dolphin, marlin, wahoo and more.

His charter business demands using the most reliable, dependable, safe and functional gear available for days and weeks at a time. Downtime means lost business, and during the peak season, he can’t afford it.

Walker’s personal choice for a boat is a 32-foot Twin Vee catamaran that is designed for commercial charter fishing. It features a wide beam, with stable deck that gives up to six customers plenty of room to fish and relax.

“I have captained boats from 20 to 60 feet, and this is the best riding fishing rig that I have ever been on.”

To get his clients on fish—and sometimes that takes hours of run time out into the Gulf—Walker depends on Yamaha. His boat is powered by class-leading V6 4.2L F300 outboards.

Why Yamaha? Here’s why.

“I started out with the 250 four stroke, and after about five good years with those, the 300 horsepower came out.”

“The fuel efficiency is just as good, and the speed is incredible,” continued Walker. “The light weight is very consistent with what I need to make the catamaran hull perform at it’s best.”

That is a lot of bragging but it’s true. When cruising at 4000 RPM the F300’s speed is up to 19% faster than other 300 h.p. brands. That is achieved by technology that results in an outboard that is lightest in its class with the largest displacement.

Walker has reason to brag about fuel economy. He might run 100 miles—or more—one-way, on an average trip. The F300 features up to 17% better long-range fuel economy than comparable 300 h.p. four-stroke outboards. That is due to Yamaha’s class-leading technology.  [just make sure you have all the data to support these claims]

Here is the most impressive statistic of them all. Walker’s twin F300s have 5,600 hours* and counting of dependable operation in all kinds of weather, fishing conditions, and for weeks at the time. 

“Without the dependability of Yamaha, we can’t feed our families, get the trips off and keep our customer’s happy.”

Click here to see an interactive view with all of the benefits of the Yamaha V6 Offshore Four Stroke.

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com Today.

*Results are based on commercial use, and may vary for traditional retail consumer use.  This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only, and are not intended to be an endorsement.

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Fishing for Black Sea Bass

 

Fishing for Black Sea Bass

By Craig Lamb

Abundant, easy to catch and an epicurean delight. That’s the black sea bass, a bottom species that is found throughout a wide range of depths and places along coastal areas.

From New England to Florida anglers enjoy fishing for sea bass from bays and tidal rivers, to great distances offshore. That spans a wide range of depths up to 200 feet and more.

Go fishing for sea bass and you need an offshore boat that can handle pounding waves, surging seas and offer safety and comfort for everyone on board. Add luxury to the mix, and you are aboard a Tidewater Boat.

Luxury appointments and the durability, toughness, and fishability required by serious saltwater anglers. Combining the comfort and style of a yacht into a boat designed for offshore fishing is a tall order. But the engineers and designers at Tidewater Boats did it all in the 320 CC Adventure.

From the premium upholstery to the highly refined seating and spacious storage, the Tidewater 320 CC delivers it all in style. The boat is loaded with high-end fishing features that meet the needs of any saltwater angler going miles offshore for a day of fishing. Back at port, the 320 CC turns into a masterpiece suitable for cruising the bays, canals, and inlets in style.

The 320 CC has a centerline of 32′ 2″ with a beam width of 10′ 4.” With a weight of 8,200 pounds, the 320 CC has a capacity of 2,200 pounds. Deadrise at the transom is 22 degrees and the boat drafts approximately 23 inches. With a recommended 700 horsepower the 320 CC is ideal for ultimate offshore four strokes. That, of course, is the 5.3L V8 F350C, the most reliable and powerful in its class.

Inside the 320 CC is an abundance of space. Aft cockpit depth is 27” with a midship depth of 37.” Bow depth is 37, ” and the 320 CC has a bridge clearance of 108.”

Fish for sea bass year round, and especially in winter when other species are less available. Along the Atlantic Coast, sea bass make their winter homes around wrecks and artificial reefs from 50- to 100-feet deep. The good news is that after making a chilly run to the prime depths and habitat, you can usually fill a cooler with this delightfully tasting fish.

Sea bass also gather in large schools during spring, summer, and fall to feed over reefs and wrecks. Finding a few means, many others are around. Catch one, and the others will be tricked into believing that a feeding frenzy is underway. Best of all, and based on their competitive nature when schooling, sea bass will bite a variety of offerings. Clams, squid strips and small baitfish make ideal baits.

Rig those to pre-tied high-low rigs or make your own. You do that by tying two dropper loops about two feet apart, and adding to each a 3/0 light wire bait hook. Tie the rig sinker loop at the top, about two feet below the bottom hook, and slide on a two- or three-ounce bank sinker.

Adjust rod, reel and line to the depth fished. Start light with spinning tackle and progress to stout casting rigs for the deeper fish.

Rigged up ad ready, turn on the fishfinder when approaching sea bass structure and look for evidence of the fish on the top and sides of the bottom. If present, drop down and hang on.

Visit Tidewater Boats.com Today!

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

Charleston Water Taxi Depends on Yamaha to Stay on Time

 

Charleston Water Taxi Depends on Yamaha to Stay on Time

By Craig Lamb

The Ms. Evelyn and Dorothy Marie are 40-foot Corinthian Catamarans that run a continuous loop around Charleston Harbor. From 9 a.m. until 8 p.m. daily, the Charleston Water Taxi boats ferry passengers to and from historical sites and the entertainment and dining district that are unique to the South Carolina coastal town.

The water taxis run every hour with a 30-minute turnaround time over the 4-mile, round-trip excursion. A tight, nonstop schedule running 11 hours each day of the year makes being on time the most important part of the business.

That is why Capt. Scott Connelly and Capt. Chip Deaton, co-owners of the Charleston Water Taxi, depend on Yamaha to power their catamarans.

“People depend on us to be on schedule, every day, seven days a week,” said Connelly, like his partner, natives of Charleston who’ve made lifelong careers of working on the water.

“Keeping that hourly schedule is key to us,” added Deaton. “We are a taxi service and the reliability of Yamaha proved itself to us in the first year.”

That was back in 2005 when they launched the business.

“We went with Yamaha first, knowing it would be the most dependable brand for us, especially with the risks involved in launching a new business,” explained Connelly.

“We went with 150 horsepower outboards and got 800 hours from the first set without any problems,” continued Deaton. “We kept on going with another set of 150s and got 8,700 hours from those outboards.”

“We can’t afford downtime, and at the end of the day we want to go home, be with our families.”

They get to do that thanks to the dependability of Yamaha technology. In fact, the current set of 2.8L F200 In-Line Four outboards has produced remarkable performance.

“We have 7,000 and counting on this set,” continued Deaton.

To put that into perspective, running an outboard motor for 7,000 hours is equivalent to driving a vehicle for 225,000 miles in urban commuting.

“Other than routine maintenance we haven’t had any issues with our Yamahas,” said Connelly.

Click here to see an interactive graphic for benefits of the F200.

Repowering the Ms. Evelyn and Dorothy Marie was made easy with mounting centers and bolt patterns that are identical to Yamaha’s two-stroke HPDI 200. Upgrading to digital rigging was easy, too.

Connelly and Deaton like the faster acceleration, efficient power and best power-to-weight ratio of the F200. Passengers like the benefit of carrying on conversations about their Charleston experience and touring plans. They do that thanks in part to the new Shift Dampener System (SDS) hardware. An SDS propeller, together with counterbalancing shafts, helps minimize shifting vibration for a quieter, smoother ride.

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com 

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

Terminally Well

 

Terminally Well  

By Capt. Gus Cane

Even the most expensive rods and reels are worthless without critical hardware. Catching coastal fish requires a wide variety of terminal tackle—the hooks, swivels, line, leader, crimps and other components that complete the rigs. You might be targeting a certain species. But in the briny, you never know what might show up so it pays to be fully prepared to capitalize on whatever opportunities might arise.

Obviously, line is needed on the reels. The choice between braid and monofilament is a personal one. Both have distinct advantages and disadvantages. Having multiple combos on board offers more flexibility and allows a quick switch from light to heavy if the situation calls for it. If space is limited, carry spare spools loaded with different line classes in case of a break-off, bird’s next or the need to scale up or down.

A similar situation exists with leader material. Multiple spools of different line strengths allow for fast changes. Monofilament leader works well for many applications. For super spooky fish or in clear water conditions, fluorocarbon leader is another option. Again, there are pros and cons to each leader type. Having a mix in the tackle bag will cover all bases. Toothy game fish like king, Spanish and cero mackerel, along with wahoo, barracuda, and sharks, often require the use of wire leader. Single-strand, coated and multi-strand cable are all handy depending on the circumstances. A mix will handle any variables.

The same holds true for an assortment of terminal tackle. Hooks come in multiple styles, sizes, and strengths. A thin-wire 1/0 circle hook nose-hooked to a small pinfish is a good match for a trophy seatrout. But that same hook would be way too light for feeding a palm-size pilchard to an 80-pound tarpon. Similarly, the treble hook on a six-inch surface popper just won’t work as a stinger hook on a kingfish rig. That’s why quantity, quality, and application are so important with terminal tackle. You could go through multiple rigs during a hot bite, and you certainly don’t want to run out or have the wrong stuff. Be prepared, and you’ll be ready for whatever you might encounter.

A good way to organize terminal tackle is by type and sometime species. Clear plastic tackle boxes with multiple (or adjustable) compartments allow loading by size or style. For example, keeping multiple sizes of swivels and crimps in one box allows a quick visual reference. Hooks and sinkers can be organized the same way. The boxes can be color coordinated or labeled with tape or magic marker. Loading several boxes in an open duffel bag makes them easier to tote.

Don’t forget the specialized terminal tackle items either. Plastic beads, copper wire, rubber tubing, dusters, dental floss, floats and balloons all have their place in special rigs. Don’t overlook the rigging tools as well. Pliers, crimpers, needles, deboners, bait knives, scissors and other accessories should be kept with the terminal tackle for quick access.

When you’re 30 miles offshore on a weed line loaded with gaffer dolphin, you don’t want to run out of the right hooks or rigs. Stock up and organize your terminal tackle and you won’t be disappointed.

Learn More Visit Yamaha Outboards.com Today.

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Win a Carolina Skiff, support conservation

 

Win a Carolina Skiff, support conservation

By Craig Lamb

The CCA Florida STAR presented by Yamaha is a win-win proposition for saltwater anglers. For 101 days this summer they have the chance to win $500,000 in prizes, including three boats by Carolina Skiff, for catching tagged redfish. There are other prizes and categories too, making this a great excuse for going fishing in the coastal and offshore waters of Florida.

How you win the prizes is by entering STAR, which stands for State-wide Tournament Anglers Rodeo. It is a catch and photograph format tournament that begins on Memorial Day, May 27, and ends on Sept. 4. The tournament is open to members in good standing of the Coastal Conservation Association, or non-members can enter for $65. Entry fee for CCA members is $35. Click here to join CCA.

STAR was a huge success last year. The 157 tagged redfish release throughout Florida coastal waters, and the 13 additional divisions caught the attention of 5,000 registered anglers. The motivation was catching one of the first seven tagged redfish for the chance to win a new GMC Sierra, a boat, motor, and trailer package valued at over $40,000. 

Beyond that, the family-friendly tournament awarded a college scholarship and the chance to win other prizes. Those prizes can be won by entering catches in the additional divisions. Those are Open, Ladies, Fly, Kayak, Lionfish and Professional Guides division. Eligible species are Spotted Seatrout, Snook, Sheepshead, Non-tagged Redfish, Cobia, Dolphin (Mahi Mahi) & Kingfish.

The Tagged Redfish Division is by far one of the most popular for a huge reason. Click this link to find out the reasons why. Even more, reason to enter that division are the three Carolina Skiffs to be awarded.

Those are the all-new Carolina Skiff 21 Fish & Ski and two Carolina Skiff 16 JVX CC models.

The JVX Series is designed and rigged with fishing in mind. With the JVX, getting in the shallow creeks and rivers will not be an issue. The lightweight hull with the modified V-hull design gives you a boat that will carry more weight further and faster with less horsepower, while delivering outstanding performance.

The STAR Youth Scholarship Division presented by Academy Sports + Outdoors offers New Tide member’s free entry into STAR and the opportunity to win one of twelve scholarships totaling $100,000.

Another fun division for STAR anglers, unique to Florida is the Conservation Division. This division is designed to reward anglers that provide the most catch data on all fish caught and released while fishing the tournament, no matter what species or size.

Here’s the win-win proposition for anglers entering STAR. All entries provide a significant amount of catch data. The conservation community uses the information to make science-based decisions that benefit habitat management, stock assessment and more, to make fishing better all around for Florida anglers.

The newest addition to Florida STAR is the Trash Division. Participants who gather trash while on the water and submit a photo entry of at least a 5-gallon bucket full of trash with the 2017 official measuring device in their entry will be eligible for a random drawing at the end of the 101 days of STAR for 1st thru 3rd place.

Participants must use a digital camera or a digital camera phone to photograph their tournament fish. Catch entries will be made via the STAR Smart device application or the STAR website.  It is not necessary to have a smart phone in order to participate.  A digital camera and the ability to enter your catch via the website will work just as well. To find a dealer click the Find a Dealer link here.

Visit Carolina Skiff Today. 

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com